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The Help

A Novel

Jackson, Mississippi, 1962. Black maids raise white children, but aren’t trusted not to steal the silver. Some lines will never be crossed. Aibileen is a black maid: smart, regal, and raising her seventeenth white child. Yet something shifted inside Aibileen the day her own son died while his bosses looked the other way. Minny, Aibileen’s best friend, is by some way the sassiest woman in Mississippi. But even her extraordinary cooking won’t protect Minny from the consequences of her tongue. Twenty-two-year-old Skeeter returns home with a degree and a head full of hope, but her mother will not be happy until there’s a ring on her finger. Seeking solace with Constantine, the beloved maid who raised her, Skeeter finds she has gone. But why will no one tell her where? Seemingly as different as can be, Skeeter, Aibileen and Minny’s lives converge over a clandestine project that will not only put them all at risk but also change the town of Jackson for ever. But why? And for what? The Help is a deeply moving, timeless and universal story about the lines we abide by, and the ones we won’t. Itis about how women, whether mothers or daughters, the help or the boss, relate to each other – and that terrible feeling that those who look after your children may understand them, even love them, better than you . . .

Rezension
Praise for The Help

"The two principal maid characters...leap off the page in all their warm, three dimensional glory...[A] winning novel."-The New York Times

"This could be one of the most important pieces of fiction since To Kill a Mockingbird...If you read only one book...let this be it."-NPR.org

"Wise, poignant...You'll catch yourself cheering out loud."-People

"Graceful and real, a compulsively readable story."-Entertainment Weekly

"A beautiful portrait of a fragmenting world."-The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

"The must-read choice of every book club in the country."-The Huffington Post

"At turns hilarious and heart-warming."-Associated Press

"In a page-turner that brings new resonance to the moral issues involved, Stockett spins a story of a social awakening as seen from both sides of the American racial divide."-The Washington Post
Portrait
Kathryn Stockett was born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi. After graduating from the University of Alabama with a degree in English and creative writing, she moved to New York City, where she worked in magazine publishing and marketing for sixteen years. She currently lives in Atlanta with her husband and daughter.
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  • Aibileen

    chapter 1

    August 1962

    Mae Mobley was born on a early Sunday morning in August 1960. A church baby we like to call it. Taking care a white babies, that's what I do, along with all the cooking and the cleaning. I done raised seventeen kids in my lifetime. I know how to get them babies to sleep, stop crying, and go in the toilet bowl before they mamas even get out a bed in the morning.

    But I ain't never seen a baby yell like Mae Mobley Leefolt. First day I walk in the door, there she be, red-hot and hollering with the colic, fighting that bottle like it's a rotten turnip. Miss Leefolt, she look terrified a her own child. "What am I doing wrong? Why can't I stop it?"

    It? That was my first hint: something is wrong with this situation.

    So I took that pink, screaming baby in my arms. Bounced her on my hip to get the gas moving and it didn't take two minutes fore Baby Girl stopped her crying, got to smiling up at me like she do. But Miss Leefolt, she don't pick up her own baby for the rest a the day. I seen plenty a womens get the baby blues after they done birthing. I reckon I thought that's what it was.

    Here's something about Miss Leefolt: she not just frowning all the time, she skinny. Her legs is so spindly, she look like she done growed em last week. Twenty-three years old and she lanky as a fourteen-year-old boy. Even her hair is thin, brown, see-through. She try to tease it up, but it only make it look thinner. Her face be the same shape as that red devil on the redhot candy box, pointy chin and all. Fact, her whole body be so full a sharp knobs and corners, it's no wonder she can't soothe that baby. Babies like fat. Like to bury they face up in you armpit and go to sleep. They like big fat legs too. That I know.

    By the time she a year old, Mae Mobley following me around everwhere I go. Five o'clock would come round and she'd be hanging on my Dr. Scholl shoe, dragging over the floor, crying like I weren't never coming back. Miss Leefolt, she'd narrow up her eyes at me like I done something wrong, unhitch that crying baby off my foot. I reckon that's the risk you run, letting somebody else raise you chilluns.

    Mae Mobley two years old now. She got big brown eyes and honey-color curls. But the bald spot in the back of her hair kind a throw things off. She get the same wrinkle between her eyebrows when she worried, like her mama. They kind a favor except Mae Mobley so fat. She ain't gone be no beauty queen. I think it bother Miss Leefolt, but Mae Mobley my special baby.

    I lost my own boy, Treelore, right before I started waiting on Miss Leefolt. He was twenty-four years old. The best part of a personÕs life. It just wasnÕt enough time living in this world.

    He had him a little apartment over on Foley Street. Seeing a real nice girl name Frances and I spec they was gone get married, but he was slow bout things like that. Not cause he looking for something better, just cause he the thinking kind. Wore big glasses and reading all the time. He even start writing his own book, bout being a colored man living and working in Mississippi. Law, that made me proud. But one night he working late at the Scanlon-Taylor mill, lugging two-by-fours to the truck, splinters slicing all the way through the glove. He too small for that kind a work, too skinny, but he needed the job. He was tired. It was raining. He slip off the loading dock, fell down on the drive. Tractor trailer didn't see him and crushed his lungs fore he could move. By the time I found out, he was dead.

    That was the day my whole world went black. Air look black, sun look black. I laid up in bed and stared at the black walls a my house. Minny came ever day to make sure I was still breathing, feed me food to keep me living. Took three months fore I even look out the window, see if the world still there. I was surprise to see the world didn't stop just cause my boy did.

    Five months afte
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 480
Erscheinungsdatum 01.06.2010
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-425-23398-6
Verlag Penguin LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 17.2/10.8/3.5 cm
Gewicht 231 g
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Fr. 14.90
Fr. 14.90
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
zzgl. Versandkosten
Versandfertig innert 1 - 2 Werktagen,  Kostenlose Lieferung ab Fr.  30 i
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Kundenbewertungen

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12 Bewertungen
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so touchy
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 12.05.2018

I’ve seen the movie years ago and probably that’s why it took me so long to start reading this book. Usually I read a book, go watch the movie and then I complain how the movie destroyed the whole story. But because I loved the film so much, I was afraid that the book would ‘destroy’ this wonderful experience. How wrong I was. ... I’ve seen the movie years ago and probably that’s why it took me so long to start reading this book. Usually I read a book, go watch the movie and then I complain how the movie destroyed the whole story. But because I loved the film so much, I was afraid that the book would ‘destroy’ this wonderful experience. How wrong I was. After reading the book I love the movie even more, it so fittingly cast, so well done. Still I would recommend to everyone to read the book, because some parts the movie didn’t manage to get that right. Some characters are even meaner in the book and some are nicer, others where completely forgotten. What I loved most about the book where those characters, those that where forgotten, the quiet girls who weren’t racists but were as progressive as the main character. Simply said: I loved this book (and I still love the movie)!

von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 16.03.2016
Bewertet: anderes Format

Ein wichtiges, teilweise anrührendes, teilweise witziges Buch über die absurden Alltäglichkeiten der Rassentrennung mitten im 20. Jahrhundert. Unbedingt lesenswert.

von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Hilden am 16.03.2016
Bewertet: anderes Format

Eine ganz tolle Erzählung über Freundschaft, Herkunft, Solidarität und Mut. Ganz wunderbar! Auch im Original gut lesbar - nicht zu schwierig.