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Nemesis

“Roth’s book has the elegance of a fable and the tragic inevitability of a Greek drama.”—
The New Yorker

“An artfully constructed, suspenseful novel with a cunning twist towards the end.”—J. M. Coetzee,
New York Review of Books

“Elegant. . . . Suffused with precise and painful tenderness. . . . Stands out for its warmth.” —
The New York Times Book Review

 

“Painful and powerful. . . . Somberly but vividly, [Roth] recreates the panic and fear triggered by polio.” —
USA Today

“A perfectly proportioned Greek tragedy played out against the background of the polio epidemic that swept Newark, New Jersey, during the summer of 1944.” —
Financial Times

 

 “Like a very well-executed O. Henry story. . . . A parable about the embrace of conscience. . . .and what its suffocating, life-denying consequences can be.” –Michiko Kakutani,
The
New York Times

 

“Yet another small triumph from one of our native artists largest in spirit. And by small I mean in length of the book. . . . This dual portrait, of a neighborhood and of a man quite representative of the times when trouble struck his neighborhood with lethal force, gives this new novel a singular appeal.” —
Chicago Tribune

 

“Roth writes a lean, vigorous prose that burns with the intensity of his purpose. It flows smoothly even when he wrestles with the knottiest of philosophical problems.” —
Plain Dealer

 

“Exquisite. It is utterly straightforward American realism that could almost have been written not long after
Letting Go and
Goodbye Columbus at the beginning of Roth’s career.” —
Buffalo News

 

“Roth is all about character and how we are shaped by improbable circumstances, and here he offers up insight to match his many years on the job.” —
San Francisco Chronicle

 

“Grippingly and with documentary expertise, it tells a story set in the devastating 1944 polio epidemic. . . . Roth writes vividly of heat-choked streets and cramped houses.” —
Boston Globe

 

“Classic Roth: handsomely written, historically evocative and brutally honest about human emotions. . . . Impressive.” —Richmond Times Dispatch

 

“Roth’s prose, that magnificent voice of his, has always fed off the twin passions of lust and rage.” —
The
New Republic

 

“Roth does an excellent job of conjuring up the fear that polio caused before the arrival of a vaccine. . . . Cantor is one of Roth’s best creations and the atmosphere of terror is masterfully fashioned.” —The Daily Telegraph (UK)

 

“Roth has always been terrific at rendering the times and places close to his own youth. And in Nemesis, he masterly contrasts the sweaty, close world of all-day ball games and nights spent on front stoops with affluence and young love developing in the cool countryside. . . . A quick, propulsive read full of chiseled storytelling.” —
Chicago Sun-Times

 

“Some of the most scathing and beautiful prose of our time.” —
The Toronto Star

 

“Part of the appeal—and the strangeness—of Roth’s novel is the way that it renders this situation, with its seemingly undramatic topic and unlikely protagonist, without hyperbole, yet maintains a grasp on the tension and ethical drama.” —
The
Times Literary Supplement (London)
Rezension
"Roth's book has the elegance of a fable and the tragic inevitability of a Greek drama."-The New Yorker

"An artfully constructed, suspenseful novel with a cunning twist towards the end."-J. M. Coetzee, New York Review of Books

"Elegant. . . . Suffused with precise and painful tenderness. . . . Stands out for its warmth." -The New York Times Book Review

"Painful and powerful. . . . Somberly but vividly, [Roth] recreates the panic and fear triggered by polio." -USA Today

"A perfectly proportioned Greek tragedy played out against the background of the polio epidemic that swept Newark, New Jersey, during the summer of 1944." -Financial Times

"Like a very well-executed O. Henry story. . . . A parable about the embrace of conscience. . . .and what its suffocating, life-denying consequences can be." -Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

"Yet another small triumph from one of our native artists largest in spirit. And by small I mean in length of the book. . . . This dual portrait, of a neighborhood and of a man quite representative of the times when trouble struck his neighborhood with lethal force, gives this new novel a singular appeal." -Chicago Tribune

"Roth writes a lean, vigorous prose that burns with the intensity of his purpose. It flows smoothly even when he wrestles with the knottiest of philosophical problems." -Plain Dealer

"Exquisite. It is utterly straightforward American realism that could almost have been written not long after Letting Go and Goodbye Columbus at the beginning of Roth's career." -Buffalo News

"Roth is all about character and how we are shaped by improbable circumstances, and here he offers up insight to match his many years on the job." -San Francisco Chronicle

"Grippingly and with documentary expertise, it tells a story set in the devastating 1944 polio epidemic. . . . Roth writes vividly of heat-choked streets and cramped houses." -Boston Globe

"Classic Roth: handsomely written, historically evocative and brutally honest about human emotions. . . . Impressive." -Richmond Times Dispatch

"Roth's prose, that magnificent voice of his, has always fed off the twin passions of lust and rage." -The New Republic

"Roth does an excellent job of conjuring up the fear that polio caused before the arrival of a vaccine. . . . Cantor is one of Roth's best creations and the atmosphere of terror is masterfully fashioned." -The Daily Telegraph (UK)

"Roth has always been terrific at rendering the times and places close to his own youth. And in Nemesis, he masterly contrasts the sweaty, close world of all-day ball games and nights spent on front stoops with affluence and young love developing in the cool countryside. . . . A quick, propulsive read full of chiseled storytelling." -Chicago Sun-Times

"Some of the most scathing and beautiful prose of our time." -The Toronto Star

"Part of the appeal-and the strangeness-of Roth's novel is the way that it renders this situation, with its seemingly undramatic topic and unlikely protagonist, without hyperbole, yet maintains a grasp on the tension and ethical drama." -The Times Literary Supplement (London)

From the Trade Paperback edition.
Portrait
In 1997 Philip Roth won the Pulitzer Prize for
American Pastoral. In 1998 he received the National Medal of Arts at
the White House and in 2002 the highest award of the American
Academy of Arts and Letters, the Gold Medal in Fiction.
He twice won the National Book Award and the National
Book Critics Circle Award. He won the PEN/Faulkner
Award three times. In 2005
The Plot Against America received
the Society of American Historians’ Prize for “the outstanding
historical novel on an American theme for 2003–2004.”
Roth received PEN’s two most prestigious awards:
in 2006 the PEN/Nabokov Award and in 2007 the PEN/Bellow Award for achievement in American fiction. In 2011 he received the National Humanities
Medal at the White House, and was later named the fourth
recipient of the Man Booker International Prize. He died in 2018.
… weiterlesen
  • Artikelbild-0
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  • Equatorial Newark

    The first case of polio that summer came early in June, right after Memorial Day, in a poor Italian neighborhood crosstown from where we lived. Over in the city's southwestern corner, in the Jewish Weequahic section, we heard nothing about it, nor did we hear anything about the next dozen cases scattered singly throughout Newark in nearly every neighborhood but ours. Only by the Fourth of July, when there were already forty cases reported in the city, did an article appear on the front page of the evening paper, titled "Health Chief Puts Parents on Polio Alert," in which Dr. William Kittell, superintendent of the Board of Health, was quoted as cautioning parents to monitor their children closely and to contact a physician if a child exhibited symptoms such as headache, sore throat, nausea, stiff neck, joint pain, or fever. Though Dr. Kittell acknowledged that forty polio cases was more than twice as many as normally reported this early in the polio season, he wanted it clearly understood that the city of 429,000 was by no means suffering from what could be characterized as an epidemic of poliomyelitis. This summer as every summer, there was reason for concern and for the proper hygienic precautions to be taken, but there was as yet no cause for the sort of alarm that had been displayed by parents, "justifiably enough," twenty-eight years earlier, during the largest outbreak of the disease ever reported-the 1916 polio epidemic in the northeastern United States, when there had been more than 27,000 cases, with 6,000 deaths. In Newark there had been 1,360 cases and 363 deaths.
    Now even in a year with an average number of cases, when the chances of contracting polio were much reduced from what they'd been back in 1916, a paralytic disease that left a youngster permanently disabled and deformed or unable to breathe outside a cylindrical metal respirator tank known as an iron lung-or that could lead from paralysis of the respiratory muscles to death-caused the parents in our neighborhood considerable apprehension and marred the peace of mind of children who were free of school for the summer months and able to play outdoors all day and into the long twilit evenings. Concern for the dire consequences of falling seriously ill from polio was compounded by the fact that no medicine existed to treat the disease and no vaccine to produce immunity. Polio-or infantile paralysis, as it was called when the disease was thought to infect mainly toddlers-could befall anyone, for no apparent reason. Though children up to sixteen were usually the sufferers, adults too could become severely infected, as had the current president of the United States.
    Franklin Delano Roosevelt, polio's most renowned victim, had contracted the disease as a vigorous man of thirty-nine and subsequently had to be supported when he walked and, even then, had to wear heavy steel-and-leather braces from his hips to his feet to enable him to stand. The charitable institution that FDR founded while he was in the White House, the March of Dimes, raised money for research and for financial assistance to the families of the stricken; though partial or even full recovery was possible, it was often only after months or years of expensive hospital therapy and rehabilitation. During the annual fund drive, America's young donated their dimes at school to help in the fi ght against the disease, they dropped their dimes into collection cans passed around by ushers in movie theaters, and posters announcing "You Can Help, Too!" and "Help Fight Polio!" appeared on the walls of stores and offi ces and in the corridors of schools across the country, posters of children in wheelchairs-a pretty little girl wearing leg braces shyly sucking her thumb, a clean-cut little boy with leg braces heroically smiling with hope-posters that made the possibility of getting the disease seem all the more frighteningly real to otherwise healthy children.
    Summer
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 288
Erscheinungsdatum 01.10.2011
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-307-74541-5
Verlag Random House LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 17.5/10.6/2.5 cm
Gewicht 144 g
Verkaufsrang 19207
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Fr. 11.90
Fr. 11.90
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Nemesis
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 27.05.2013
Bewertet: Format: eBook (ePUB)

Die Geschichte spielt im Sommer 1944, aber nicht irgendein Sommer. Der Krieg in Übersee ist in einer entscheidenden Phase. Der Protagonist Bucky Cantor, empfand es als Strafe, aufgrund seiner Kurzsichtigkeit nicht an die Front geschickt zu werden. Bucky ist Mitte zwanzig und seit kurzem Sportlehrer an der Newarker Schule. Dort... Die Geschichte spielt im Sommer 1944, aber nicht irgendein Sommer. Der Krieg in Übersee ist in einer entscheidenden Phase. Der Protagonist Bucky Cantor, empfand es als Strafe, aufgrund seiner Kurzsichtigkeit nicht an die Front geschickt zu werden. Bucky ist Mitte zwanzig und seit kurzem Sportlehrer an der Newarker Schule. Dort hat er für die Sommermonate die Aufsicht über einige Kinder. Plötzlich und dann mit aller Macht bricht eine heimtückische Viruserkrankung über das Städtchen aus… Es gibt mehrere Todesfälle unter den Kindern, die Angst Panik und Verzweiflung hinterlassen. In dem Roman geht es um Schicksalsschläge, die das Leben plötzlich in andere Bahnen lenken kann. Die Zerrissenheit ist ein wichtiger Kern des Romans. Roth bedient sich in „Nemesis“ der Göttin der Gerechtigkeit und stellt die Frage: wer soll für welche Sünde bestraft werden… Es ist eine absolut lesenswerte tiefgründige Erzählung

Schrecken der Polio....
von Marion Olßon aus Reutlingen am 29.03.2013
Bewertet: Format: eBook (ePUB)

1944 erschüttert ein verherrender Ausbruch der Kinderlähmung das jüdische Viertel in Newark, Amerika.Hunderten von Kindern droht bleibender Schaden und sogar der Tod. Wer kann flieht aus der heißen Stadt aufs Land.In diesem extrem heißen Sommer bewahrt ein junger Sportlehrer einen klaren Kopf und kümmert sich weiter um die K... 1944 erschüttert ein verherrender Ausbruch der Kinderlähmung das jüdische Viertel in Newark, Amerika.Hunderten von Kindern droht bleibender Schaden und sogar der Tod. Wer kann flieht aus der heißen Stadt aufs Land.In diesem extrem heißen Sommer bewahrt ein junger Sportlehrer einen klaren Kopf und kümmert sich weiter um die Kinder und Jugendlichen seiner Sportgruppe. Als nach und nach seine Schützlinge erkranken und sterben, muß sich Bucky zwischen dem Pflichbewusstsein und der Liebe entscheiden. Für kurze Zeit siegt sein Verlangen,er geht zu Marcia,seiner Freundin , die auf dem Land lebt.Doch dann siegt die Verantwortlichkeit für seine " Kinder".Und er beginnt den Kampf gegen die Ausbreitung der Krankheit und den Vorurteilen seinem Volk gegenüber. Ein aufwühlender und ergreifender Roman, der den Schrecken der Polio aufzeigt und die Unwissenheit im letzten Jarhundert, wie damit um zu gehen ist.Es wird aber auch sehr deutlich widergespiegelt, dass die Vorurteile den Juden gegenüber in den vierziger Jahren des letzten Jahrhunderts noch tief in den Köpfen der Andersgläubigen verankert war.