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The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Five Novels in One Outrageous Volume

In one complete volume, here are the five classic novels from Douglas Adams's beloved Hitchhiker series.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Nominated as one of America's best-loved novels by PBS's The Great American Read)
Seconds before the Earth is demolished for a galactic freeway, Arthur Dent is saved by Ford Prefect, a researcher for the revised Guide. Together they stick out their thumbs to the stars and begin a wild journey through time and space.

The Restaurant at the End of the Universe
The moment before annihilation at the hands of warmongers is a curious time to crave tea. It could only happen to the cosmically displaced Arthur Dent and his comrades as they hurtle across the galaxy in a desperate search for a place to eat.

Life, the Universe and Everything
The unhappy inhabitants of planet Krikkit are sick of looking at the night sky- so they plan to destroy it. The universe, that is. Now only five individuals can avert Armageddon: mild-mannered Arthur Dent and his stalwart crew.

So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish
Back on Earth, Arthur Dent is ready to believe that the past eight years were all just a figment of his stressed-out imagination. But a gift-wrapped fishbowl with a cryptic inscription thrusts him back to reality. So to speak.

Mostly Harmless
Just when Arthur Dent makes the terrible mistake of starting to enjoy life, all hell breaks loose. Can he save the Earth from total obliteration? Can he save the Guide from a hostile alien takeover? Can he save his daughter from herself?

Includes the bonus story "Young Zaphod Plays It Safe"

"With droll wit, a keen eye for detail and heavy doses of insight . . . Adams makes us laugh until we cry."-San Diego Union-Tribune

"Lively, sharply satirical, brilliantly written . . . ranks with the best set pieces in Mark Twain."-The Atlantic
Rezension
"WITH DROLL WIT, A KEEN EYE FOR DETAIL AND HEAVY DOSES OF INSIGHT . . . ADAMS MAKES US LAUGH UNTIL WE CRY."
-San Diego Union

"LIVELY, SHARPLY SATIRICAL, BRILLIANTLY WRITTEN . . . RANKS WITH THE BEST SET PIECES IN MARK TWAIN."
-The Atlantic
Portrait
Douglas Adams was born in 1952 and educated at Cambridge. He was the author of five books in the Hitchhiker's Trilogy, including The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy; The Restaurant at the End of the Universe; Life, the Universe and Everything; So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish; and Mostly Harmless. His other works include Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency; The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul; The Meaning of Liff and The Deeper Meaning of Liff (with John Lloyd); and Last Chance to See (with Mark Carwardine). His last book was the bestselling collection, The Salmon of Doubt, published posthumously in May 2002.
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  • What Was He Like,
    Douglas Adams?

    He was tall, very tall. He had an air of cheerful diffidence. He
    combined a razor-sharp intellect and understanding of what
    he was doing with the puzzled look of someone who had
    backed into a profession that surprised him in a world that
    perplexed him. And he gave the impression that, all in all, he was rather
    enjoying it.

    He was a genius, of course. It's a word that gets tossed around a lot
    these days, and it's used to mean pretty much anything. But Douglas was
    a genius, because he saw the world differently, and more importantly, he
    could communicate the world he saw. Also, once you'd seen it his way
    you could never go back.

    Douglas Noel Adams was born in 1952 in Cambridge, England (shortly
    before the announcement of an even more influential DNA, deoxyribonucleic
    acid). He was a self-described "strange child" who did not learn
    to speak until he was four. He wanted to be a nuclear physicist ("I never
    made it because my arithmetic was so bad"), then went to Cambridge to
    study English, with ambitions that involved becoming part of the tradition
    of British writer/performers (of which the members of Monty Python's
    Flying Circus are the best-known example).

    When he was eighteen, drunk in a field in Innsbruck, hitchhiking across
    Europe, he looked up at the sky filled with stars and thought, "Somebody
    ought to write the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy." Then he went to
    sleep and almost, but not quite, forgot all about it.

    He left Cambridge in 1975 and went to London where his many writ-ing
    and performing projects tended, in the main, not to happen. He
    worked with former Python Graham Chapman writing scripts and sketches
    for abortive projects (among them a show for Ringo Starr which contained
    the germ of Starship Titanic) and with writer-producer John Lloyd
    (they pitched a series called Snow Seven and the White Dwarfs, a comedy
    about two astronomers in "an observatory on Mt. Everest-"The idea
    for that was minimum casting, minimum set, and we'd just try to sell the
    series on cheapness").

    He liked science fiction, although he was never a fan. He supported
    himself through this period with a variety of odd jobs: he was, for example,
    a hired bodyguard for an oil-rich Arabian family, a job that entailed
    wearing a suit and sitting in hotel corridors through the night listening to
    the ding of passing elevators.

    In 1977 BBC radio producer (and well-known mystery author) Simon
    Brett commissioned him to write a science fiction comedy for BBC Radio
    Four. Douglas originally imagined a series of six half-hour comedies
    called The Ends of the Earth-funny stories which at the end of each, the
    world would end. In the first episode, for example, the Earth would be
    destroyed to make way for a cosmic freeway.

    But, Douglas soon realized, if you are going to destroy the Earth, you
    need someone to whom it matters. Someone like a reporter for, yes, the
    Hitchchiker's Guide to the Galaxy. And someone else . . . a man who was
    called Alaric B in Douglas's original proposal. At the last moment Douglas
    crossed out Alaric B and wrote above it Arthur Dent. A normal name
    for a normal man.

    For those people listening to BBC Radio 4 in 1978 the show came as a
    revelation. It was funny-genuinely witty, surreal, and smart. The series
    was produced by Geoffrey Perkins, and the last two episodes of the first
    series were co-written with John Lloyd.

    (I was a kid who discovered the series-accidentally, as most listeners
    did-with the second episode. I sat in the car in the driveway, getting
    cold, listening to Vogon poetry, and then the ideal radio line "Ford,
    you're turning into an infinite number of penguins," and I was happy;
    perfectly, unutterably happy.)

    By now, Douglas had a real job. He was the script editor for the long-
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 832
Erscheinungsdatum 01.04.2002
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-345-45374-7
Verlag Random House LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 23.3/15.4/4.3 cm
Gewicht 775 g
Verkaufsrang 3198
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Fr. 27.90
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Alles drin was draufsteht
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Stuttgart am 12.07.2019
Bewertet: Format: eBook (ePUB)

Hab mir das E-Book gekauft, da es um einiges leichter mit auf Reisen zu nehmen ist, als die Hardcover-Gesamtausgabe. Für Douglas-Adams-Fans ein Muss, alle anderen sollten zumindest den ersten Band mal lesen, die volle Ausgabe ist wahrscheinlich zu gewaltig und verwirrend. Zitierenswertes & Wortwitz am laufenden Band (darum au... Hab mir das E-Book gekauft, da es um einiges leichter mit auf Reisen zu nehmen ist, als die Hardcover-Gesamtausgabe. Für Douglas-Adams-Fans ein Muss, alle anderen sollten zumindest den ersten Band mal lesen, die volle Ausgabe ist wahrscheinlich zu gewaltig und verwirrend. Zitierenswertes & Wortwitz am laufenden Band (darum auch am Besten im Original) und auch in der heutigen Welt leider aktueller denn je. „To summarize the summary of the summary: people are a problem.“

Funny, philosophical, but chaotic
von Kai aus Dresden am 11.02.2015

(If you are able to read this text, you should - in my opinion - also be able to read the book in english) The Hitchhikers Guide through the Galaxy is (or at least was) one of the most famous books. I've read the complete collection in german around 10 years ago and now wanted to know whether I still like it as much. Conte... (If you are able to read this text, you should - in my opinion - also be able to read the book in english) The Hitchhikers Guide through the Galaxy is (or at least was) one of the most famous books. I've read the complete collection in german around 10 years ago and now wanted to know whether I still like it as much. Content It's very hard to give a short overview here, because in this book happen a lot of confusing things. In general it is about the human Arthur, which is forced to start space travelling with his alien friend Ford, because the earth is destroyed to make way for a hyperspace express route. Arthur has a talent to get pulled into the most improbable events and during his journeys not only saves the universe, but also finds gods last message to his creation and tries to find the question about Life, the Universe and Everything (which answer is, of course, 42). Opinion I think it is very hard to judge this book. If you want to read an exciting scifi page turner, then it's definitely the wrong one. Douglas Adams has created a chaotic mix of philosophical statements, humoristic parts and an exciting story. If you take into account that a book with this characteristics possibly only could have gone wrong and when you think a bit deeper about it, then the Hitchhiker is a really extraordinary 4* book. But at last I'm wondering if this was really all intended or if Douglas Adams just wanted to make fun of some things. And when you look at the book from that point of view, than it's not even very funny and even not very exciting, but only confusingly chaotic. At least the last book - Mostly Harmless - trys to sort some things out and is a lot better than the ones before, but it can not rescue the whole story within around 180 pages. Favourite bit (beginning of Mostly Harmless): Anything that happens, happens. Anything that, in happening, causes something else to happen, causes something else to happen. Anything that, in happening, causes itself to happen again, happens again. It doesn't necessarily do it in chronological order, though. Conclusion Read it, but don't expect too much! It's very funny in some parts and if you take some time to think things through you might also find some philosophical messages about Life, the Universe and Everything ;-)

Der ultimative Hitchhiker
von Mario Pf. aus Oberösterreich am 10.09.2008

Arthur Dent wacht eines Morgens auf, nur um festzustellen, dass sein Haus gerade davorsteht einer Umfahrungsstraße zu weichen. Die Debatten mit dem Bauleiter bringen wenig und doch sind Arthurs Probleme an diesem Tag eher unbedeutend, denn wenig später ist es die gesamte Erde die einer Umfahrungsstraße weichen soll. Mit seinem F... Arthur Dent wacht eines Morgens auf, nur um festzustellen, dass sein Haus gerade davorsteht einer Umfahrungsstraße zu weichen. Die Debatten mit dem Bauleiter bringen wenig und doch sind Arthurs Probleme an diesem Tag eher unbedeutend, denn wenig später ist es die gesamte Erde die einer Umfahrungsstraße weichen soll. Mit seinem Freund Ford Prefect, der sich plötzlich als Reisejournalist des Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy entpuppt, beginnt für Arthur eine unglaubliche Weltraumodyssee als sie auf einem Raumschiff der Bauflotte entkommen... Doch obwohl The Hitchhikers Guide to the Universe zum Kultklassiker geworden ist und auch als Weltliteratur bezeichnet wird, das Buch an sich ist unvollständig. Sein Ende wurde etwa von Douglas Adams nach mehrfach überschrittener Deadline zwischen einem Telefonat mit seinem Verleger und der Ankunft des Boten verfasst. Natürlich stört das kaum einen Leser, auch weil die fehlenden Kapitel später als "The Restaurant at the End of the Universe" veröffentlicht wurden und dem Hitchhiker damit sein rechtmäßiges Ende verleihten. Heute ist die Hitchhiker als Trilogie in fünf Teilen bekannt, der ein sehr seltsamer Kanon zu Grunde liegt. Schloss das Restaurant noch den Hitchhiker ab, war "Life, the Universe and Everything" bereits eher eine Fortsetzung, welche jedoch noch teilweise den Stil und die Atmosphäre des Hitchhikers weiterführen könnte und somit die Trilogie abschloss. "So long, and thanks for all the fish" wirkte dabei eher wie ein Anhängsel der Hitchhiker-Saga und brachte nur kurz eine Rückkehr bekannter Charaktere, während des Buchs von einer Love Story auf der plötzlich wiederauferstandenen Erde geprägt war. Douglas Adams selbst weißt im Buch darauf hin, dass man vielleicht gleich bis zu den letzten Kapiteln vorblättern sollte, da dort wieder Marvin und Ford vorkommen. Wohl auch wegen diesem irritierenden vierten Band, wollte Adams die Hitchhiker-Saga mit Mostly Harmless ein und für allemal beenden. Was er bereits mit dem eigentlichen Hitchhiker beenden wollte, endet daher im fünften Teil der Trilogie, jedoch eher verworren und zwischen den Dimensionen hin und hergerissen. Insgesamt ist die Hitchhiker-Saga jedoch ein Meisterwerk, eine hochklassige Science Fiction-Parodie mit eigener Philosophie. Unkonventionell gelingt es Douglas Adams jede Ernsthaftigkeit zu vermeiden und mit viel Witz die Galaxis zu erklären. Dabei verzichtet er betont auf echte Helden, Arthur Dent bleibt etwa durch und durch ganz gewöhnlich. Die Handlung verläuft unberechenbar und ist von Wendungen gezeichnet, die völlig unwahrscheinlich wirken, den Leser aber intellektuell stets herausfordern. In vorliegender Ausgabe ist die Hitchhiker-Saga vollständig in einem Band zusammengefasst, im Gegensatz zu manch anderen Sammelbänden aber ohne die Kurzgeschichten "Young Zaphod plays it safe". Diese ist jedoch ohnehin in Salmon of Doubt, dem offiziellen Nachlassband des Autors, enthalten. Rein preislich liegt diese Ausgabe relativ günstig und unter mancher Konkurrenz, wobei sie sich durch ein handlicheres Format und geringeres Gewicht hervortut. Fazit: Schlicht und einfach, der ideale Hitchhiker-Sammelband - günstig, einigermaßen handlich und natürlich vollständig.