Warenkorb
 

Profitieren Sie im Juli von 5-fach Meilen auf Bücher & eBooks!*

We Should All Be Feminists

The highly acclaimed, provocative New York Times bestseller from the award-winning author of Americanah, "one of the world's great contemporary writers" (Barack Obama).

In this personal, eloquently-argued essay-adapted from the much-admired TEDx talk of the same name-Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century, one rooted in inclusion and awareness. Drawing extensively on her own experiences and her deep understanding of the often masked realities of sexual politics, here is one remarkable author's exploration of what it means to be a woman now-and an of-the-moment rallying cry for why we should all be feminists.
Rezension
"Nuanced and rousing." -Vogue

"Adichie is so smart about so many things." -San Francisco Chronicle
Portrait
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is the author of award-winning and bestselling novels, including Americanah and Half of a Yellow Sun, and the short story collection The Thing Around Your Neck . A recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, she divides her time between the United States and Nigeria.
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is the author of award-winning and bestselling novels, including Americanah and Half of a Yellow Sun, and the short story collection The Thing Around Your Neck. A recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, she divides her time between the United States and Nigeria.
… weiterlesen
  • Artikelbild-0
  • INTRODUCTION

    This is a modified version of a talk I delivered in December 2012 at TEDxEuston, a yearly conference focused on Africa. Speakers from diverse fields deliver concise talks aimed at challenging and inspiring Africans and friends of Africa. I had spoken at a different TED conference a few years before, giving a talk titled 'The Danger of the Single Story' about how stereotypes limit and shape our thinking, especially about Africa. It seems to me that the word feminist, and the idea of feminism itself, is also limited by stereotypes. When my brother Chuks and best friend Ike, both co-organizers of the TEDxEuston conference, insisted that I speak, I could not say no. I decided to speak about feminism because it is something I feel strongly about. I suspected that it might not be a very popular subject, but I hoped to start a necessary conversation. And so that evening as I stood onstage, I felt as though I was in the presence of family - a kind and attentive audience, but one that might resist the subject of my talk. At the end, their standing ovation gave me hope.

    ...

    WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS

    Okoloma was one of my greatest childhood friends. He lived on my street and looked after me like a big brother: if I liked a boy, I would ask Okoloma's opinion. Okoloma was funny and intelligent and wore cowboy boots that were pointy at the tips. In December 2005, in a plane crash in southern Nigeria, Okoloma died. It is still hard for me to put into words how I felt. Okoloma was a person I could argue with, laugh with and truly talk to. He was also the first person to call me a feminist.

    I was about fourteen. We were in his house, arguing, both of us bristling with half- baked knowledge from the books we had read. I don't remember what this particular argument was about. But I remember that as I argued and argued, Okoloma looked at me and said, 'You know, you're a feminist.'

    It was not a compliment. I could tell from his tone - the same tone with which a person would say, 'You're a supporter of terrorism.'

    I did not know exactly what this word feminist meant. And I did not want Okoloma to know that I didn't know. So I brushed it aside and continued to argue. The first thing I planned to do when I got home was look up the word in the dictionary.

    Now fast-forward to some years later. In 2003, I wrote a novel called Purple Hibiscus, about a man who, among other things, beats his wife, and whose story doesn't end too well. While I was promoting the novel in Nigeria, a journalist, a nice, well-meaning man, told me he wanted to advise me. (Nigerians, as you might know, are very quick to give unsolicited advice.)

    He told me that people were saying my novel was feminist, and his advice to me - he was shaking his head sadly as he spoke - was that I should never call myself a feminist, since feminists are women who are unhappy because they cannot find husbands.

    So I decided to call myself a Happy Feminist.
In den Warenkorb

Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 64
Erscheinungsdatum 01.02.2015
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-1-101-91176-1
Verlag Random House LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 15.7/11.1/1.2 cm
Gewicht 71 g
Verkaufsrang 10684
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Fr. 12.90
Fr. 12.90
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
zzgl. Versandkosten
Versandfertig innert 1 - 2 Werktagen,  Kostenlose Lieferung ab Fr.  30 i
Versandfertig innert 1 - 2 Werktagen
Kostenlose Lieferung ab Fr.  30 i
In den Warenkorb
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback!
Entschuldigung, beim Absenden Ihres Feedbacks ist ein Fehler passiert. Bitte versuchen Sie es erneut.
Ihr Feedback zur Seite
Haben Sie alle relevanten Informationen erhalten?

Kundenbewertungen

Durchschnitt
3 Bewertungen
Übersicht
3
0
0
0
0

I would recommend everyone to read this
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 09.07.2019
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

So much truth contained in so few pages. "Human beings lived in a world in which physical strength was the most important attribute for survival; the physically stronger person was more likely to lead. (...) today we live in a vastly different world. The person more qualified to lead is not the physically stronger person. It is... So much truth contained in so few pages. "Human beings lived in a world in which physical strength was the most important attribute for survival; the physically stronger person was more likely to lead. (...) today we live in a vastly different world. The person more qualified to lead is not the physically stronger person. It is the more intelligent, the more knowledgeable, the more creative, more innovative. And there are no hormones for those attributes." If you are wondering wether or not to pick it up, consider that the book breaks done a complex topic into a small digestible piece of literature you can finish in half an hour. No time is lost and knowledge is gained.

We should all be feminists
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 16.04.2019
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Ein Buch, das jede und jeder lesen sollte! Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie legt neue Perspektiven auf ein Thema, das uns alle angeht. Sehr empfehlenswert!

Yes, we SHOULD all be feminists!
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 09.04.2019
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Are you a human being? Then you should read this. I really think that! I've already gave that booklet/essay to a couple of friends as a present. It's a short, sharp and insightful essay about gender, feminism, the wrong ideas about it and why it's so important for all of us! Just read it, or at least watch Adichies Ted-Tal... Are you a human being? Then you should read this. I really think that! I've already gave that booklet/essay to a couple of friends as a present. It's a short, sharp and insightful essay about gender, feminism, the wrong ideas about it and why it's so important for all of us! Just read it, or at least watch Adichies Ted-Talk.