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A Little Life

Nominated for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction 2015, the Baileys Women's Prize 2016, the Ferro-Grumley Award 2016, the Man Booker Prize 2015 and the National Book Award 2015

ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR
The New York Times • The Washington Post • The Wall Street Journal • NPR • Vanity Fair • Vogue • Minneapolis Star Tribune • St. Louis Post-Dispatch • The Guardian • O, The Oprah Magazine • Slate • Newsday • Buzzfeed • The Economist • Newsweek • People • Kansas City Star • Shelf Awareness • Time Out New York • Huffington Post • Book Riot • Refinery29 • Bookpage • Publishers Weekly • Kirkus

WINNER OF THE KIRKUS PRIZE
A MAN BOOKER PRIZE FINALIST
A NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST

A Little Life follows four college classmates-broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition-as they move to New York in search of fame and fortune. While their relationships, which are tinged by addiction, success, and pride, deepen over the decades, the men are held together by their devotion to the brilliant, enigmatic Jude, a man scarred by an unspeakable childhood trauma. A hymn to brotherly bonds and a masterful depiction of love in the twenty-first century, Hanya Yanagihara's stunning novel is about the families we are born into, and those that we make for ourselves.
Rezension
"Astonishing." -The Atlantic

"Deeply moving. . . . A wrenching portrait of the enduring grace of friendship." -NPR

"Elemental, irreducible." -The New Yorker

"Hypnotic. . . . An intimate, operatic friendship between four men." -The Economist

"Capacious and consuming. . . . Immersive." -The Boston Globe

"Beautiful." -Los Angeles Times

"Exquisite. . . . It's not hyperbole to call this novel a masterwork-if anything that word is simply just too little for it." -San Francisco Chronicle

"Remarkable. . . . An epic study of trauma and friendship written with such intelligence and depth of perception that it will be one of the benchmarks against which all other novels that broach those subjects (and they are legion) will be measured. . . . A Little Life announces [Yanagihara] as a major American novelist." -The Wall Street Journal

"Utterly gripping. Wonderfully romantic and sometimes harrowing, A Little Life kept me reading late into the night, night after night." -Edmund White

"Spellbinding . . . . An exquisitely written, complex triumph." -O, The Oprah Magazine

"Drawn in extraordinary detail by incantatory prose. . . . Affecting and transcendent." -The Washington Post

"[A Little Life] lands with a real sense of occasion: the arrival of a major new voice in fiction. . . . Yanagihara's achievement has less to do with size . . . than with the breadth and depth of its considerable power, which speaks not to the indomitability of the spirit, but to the fragility of the self." -Vogue

"Exquisite. . . . The book shifts from a generational portrait to something darker and more tender: an examination of the depths of human cruelty, counterbalanced by the restorative powers of friendship." -The New Yorker

"A book unlike any other. . . . A Little Life asks serious questions about humanism and euthanasia and psychiatry and any number of the partis pris of modern western life. . . . A devastating read that will leave your heart, like the Grinch's, a few sizes larger." -The Guardian

"Exceedingly good." -Newsweek

"A Little Life is unlike anything else out there. Over the top, beyond the pale and quite simply unforgettable." -The Independent

"Piercing. . . . [Yanagihara is] an author with the talent to interrogate the basest and most beautiful extremes of human behaviour with sustained, bruising intensity." -The Times Literary Supplement

"A brave novel. . . . Impressive and moving." -Literary Review

"Enthralling and completely immersive. . . . Stunning." -Daily News
Portrait
Hanya Yanagihara lives in New York City.
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    The eleventh apartment had only one closet, but it did have a sliding glass door that opened onto a small balcony, from which he could see a man sitting across the way, outdoors in only a T-shirt and shorts even though it was October, smoking. Willem held up a hand in greeting to him, but the man didn't wave back.

    In the bedroom, Jude was accordioning the closet door, opening and shutting it, when Willem came in. "There's only one closet," he said.

    "That's okay," Willem said. "I have nothing to put in it anyway."

    "Neither do I." They smiled at each other. The agent from the building wandered in after them. "We'll take it," Jude told her.

    But back at the agent's office, they were told they couldn't rent the apartment after all. "Why not?" Jude asked her.

    "You don't make enough to cover six months' rent, and you don't have anything in savings," said the agent, suddenly terse. She had checked their credit and their bank accounts and had at last realized that there was something amiss about two men in their twenties who were not a couple and yet were trying to rent a one-bedroom apartment on a dull (but still expensive) stretch of Twenty-fifth Street. "Do you have anyone who can sign on as your guarantor? A boss? Parents?"

    "Our parents are dead," said Willem, swiftly.

    The agent sighed. "Then I suggest you lower your expectations. No one who manages a well-run building is going to rent to candidates with your financial profile." And then she stood, with an air of finality, and looked pointedly at the door.

    When they told JB and Malcolm this, however, they made it into a comedy: the apartment floor became tattooed with mouse droppings, the man across the way had almost exposed himself, the agent was upset because she had been flirting with Willem and he hadn't reciprocated.

    "Who wants to live on Twenty-fifth and Second anyway," asked JB. They were at Pho Viet Huong in Chinatown, where they met twice a month for dinner. Pho Viet Huong wasn't very good--the pho was curiously sugary, the lime juice was soapy, and at least one of them got sick after every meal--but they kept coming, both out of habit and necessity. You could get a bowl of soup or a sandwich at Pho Viet Huong for five dollars, or you could get an entrée, which were eight to ten dollars but much larger, so you could save half of it for the next day or for a snack later that night. Only Malcolm never ate the whole of his entrée and never saved the other half either, and when he was finished eating, he put his plate in the center of the table so Willem and JB--who were always hungry--could eat the rest.

    "Of course we don't want to live at Twenty-fifth and Second, JB," said Willem, patiently, "but we don't really have a choice. We don't have any money, remember?"

    "I don't understand why you don't stay where you are," said Malcolm, who was now pushing his mushrooms and tofu--he always ordered the same dish: oyster mushrooms and braised tofu in a treacly brown sauce--around his plate, as Willem and JB eyed it.

    "Well, I can't," Willem said. "Remember?" He had to have explained this to Malcolm a dozen times in the last three months. "Merritt's boyfriend's moving in, so I have to move out."

    "But why do you have to move out?"

    "Because it's Merritt's name on the lease, Malcolm!" said JB.

    "Oh," Malcolm said. He was quiet. He often forgot what he considered inconsequential details, but he also never seemed to mind when people grew impatient with him for forgetting. "Right." He moved the mushrooms to the center of the table. "But you, Jude--"

    "I can't stay at your place forever, Malcolm. Your parents are going to kill me at some point."

    "My parents love you."

    "That's nice of you to say. But they won't if I don't move out, and soon."

    Malcolm was the only one of the four of them who lived at home, and as JB liked to say, if he had Malcolm's home,
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 832
Erscheinungsdatum 01.01.2016
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-8041-7270-7
Verlag Random House LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 20.3/13.2/4 cm
Gewicht 530 g
Verkaufsrang 4221
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Fr. 18.90
Fr. 18.90
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
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Heftig
von Lisa F. aus Berlin am 29.10.2016
Bewertet: Einband: gebundene Ausgabe

3,75 Sterne Ugh. Dieses Buch ist echt heftig. Es tut weh, dieses Buch zu lesen, es tut weh, aus Judes Sicht zu lesen. Aber ich finde, dass das, was Jude in seiner Kindheit passiert ist, recht übertrieben ist. So viel Schlimmes kann einem nicht nacheinander passieren, oder? Aber ich liebe die Freundschaften, die hier dargeste... 3,75 Sterne Ugh. Dieses Buch ist echt heftig. Es tut weh, dieses Buch zu lesen, es tut weh, aus Judes Sicht zu lesen. Aber ich finde, dass das, was Jude in seiner Kindheit passiert ist, recht übertrieben ist. So viel Schlimmes kann einem nicht nacheinander passieren, oder? Aber ich liebe die Freundschaften, die hier dargestellt werden, vor allem die von Willem und Jude. Diese haben mich glücklich gemacht. Alles andere hat mich nur deprimiert, ich hab es manchmal nicht aushalten können weiterzulesen. Vor allem, wie schon gesagt, Judes Kapitel. Die waren die schlimmsten. Aber traurigerweise musste ich nicht heulen. Schade eigentlich :(

Erschütternd, erhebend, schrecklich und schön
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 17.03.2016
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Dieses Buch gehört zu denen, die man nicht in einem Durchgang lesen, aber auch nicht weglegen kann. Die Autorin lässt den Leser aus mehreren Perspektiven am Leben einer Gruppe Freunde teilhaben, deren Mittelpunkt, wie sich im Laufe der Lektüre herausstellt, Jude ist. Niemand weiß genau, was er in seiner Kindheit erlebt hat, aber... Dieses Buch gehört zu denen, die man nicht in einem Durchgang lesen, aber auch nicht weglegen kann. Die Autorin lässt den Leser aus mehreren Perspektiven am Leben einer Gruppe Freunde teilhaben, deren Mittelpunkt, wie sich im Laufe der Lektüre herausstellt, Jude ist. Niemand weiß genau, was er in seiner Kindheit erlebt hat, aber alle vermuten, dass sie schlimm war. Wie schlimm, erfährt man als Leser in den Passagen, die aus Judes Sicht geschrieben sind, und ich persönlich war mehr als einmal versucht, das Buch an diesen Stellen wegzulegen, doch die Sprache und der Stil der Erzählung haben mich getrieben, weiterzulesen bis zur nächsten, mehr lebensbejahenden Szene. Im Grunde zeigt dieses Buch, was passiert, wenn jemand versucht, seine traumatische Vergangenheit zu verdrängen und wie diese nicht nur ihn selbst, sondern auch seine Freunde und sein Umfeld beeinflusst. Der Perspektivenwechsel ermöglicht es dem Leser, sich von jeder Figur ein umfassendes Bild zu machen, weil er nicht nur erfährt, wie der Charakter sich selbst sieht, sondern auch, wie ihn seine Freunde erleben. Gerade im Fall von Jude ist dieser Unterschied eklatant und ich habe mich bei der Lektüre dabei ertappt, ihm zu wünschen, er könnte mit mir lesen, wie ihn seine Freunde sehen. Ich könnte jetzt versuchen, die Handlung zusammenzufassen, die sich über 30 Jahre erstreckt, aber die ist eigentlich nebensächlich in diesem Buch und schafft nur einen Rahmen, in dem sich die emotionalen Verstrickungen der Protagonisten ausbreiten können, um den Leser unweigerlich in ihren Bann zu ziehen.