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The Silk Roads

A New History of the World

The sun is setting on the Western world. Slowly but surely, the direction in which the world spins has reversed: where for the last five centuries the globe turned westwards on its axis, it now turns to the east...For centuries, fame and fortune was to be found in the west - in the New World of the Americas. Today, it is the east which calls out to those in search of adventure and riches. The region stretching from eastern Europe and sweeping right across Central Asia deep into China and India, is taking centre stage in international politics, commerce and culture - and is shaping the modern world. This region, the true centre of the earth, is obscure to many in the English-speaking world. Yet this is where civilization itself began, where the world's great religions were born and took root. The Silk Roads were no exotic series of connections, but networks that linked continents and oceans together. Along them flowed ideas, goods, disease and death. This was where empires were won - and where they were lost. As a new era emerges, the patterns of exchange are mirroring those that have criss-crossed Asia for millennia. The Silk Roads are rising again. A major reassessment of world history, The Silk Roads is an important account of the forces that have shaped the global economy and the political renaissance in the re-emerging east.
Rezension
Many books have been written which claim to be "A New History of the World". This one fully deserves the title.It is difficult, in a short review, to do justice to a book so ambitious, so detailed and so fascinating as this one Gerald DeGroot The Times 20150808
Portrait
Peter Frankopan is Professor of Global History at Oxford University, where he is also Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, Oxford and Director of the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research. He took a First in History and was Schiff Scholar at Jesus College, Cambridge, before completing his doctorate at Oxford, where he was Senior Scholar at Corpus Christi College. He has lectured at leading universities all over the world, including Cambridge, Yale, Harvard, Princeton, NYU, King's College London and the Institute of Historical Research. His revised translation of
The Alexiad by Anna Komnene was published in 2009 and
The First Crusade was published in 2012.
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Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 656
Erscheinungsdatum 02.06.2016
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-1-4088-3999-7
Verlag Bloomsbury Academic
Maße (L/B/H) 20/13.1/4.5 cm
Gewicht 480 g
Abbildungen farbige Abbildungen
Verkaufsrang 7931
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Fr. 21.90
Fr. 21.90
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A joy to read
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 18.03.2020

The history of „the East“, or the history of non-western countries respectively, tends to get omitted from “our” historiography. Countries outside the western culture group are usually only mentioned if they’re in some way relevant to our own history. This euro-centric way of thinking is wearisome, as countless fascinating devel... The history of „the East“, or the history of non-western countries respectively, tends to get omitted from “our” historiography. Countries outside the western culture group are usually only mentioned if they’re in some way relevant to our own history. This euro-centric way of thinking is wearisome, as countless fascinating developments and entanglements get lost through it, and those are the most fun in my opinion. This book tells of one of, if not THE biggest connective network in global history: The Silk Roads. You can imagine how much fun this book was to me. The narrative style is charming, as it reads more like a story than a history book. It’s not just information after information. Connections are interwoven, the writing reads fluidly and the author prioritises explaining how things came to progress the way they did, rather than overloading the text with too much year dates or details. The book also focuses less on war or military history and more on trade and intercultural connections. A welcome alternation, as war generally never changes. If you have an interest in global history, and you love grasping connections and discovering how one thing influenced another, “The Silk Roads” will delight you. I am, at least. The book is thick (even though it is probably middle-range by the standard of history books), but it captures you from the very first page, due to both the fascinating topic as well as the writing style of the author. All in all a pleasure to read!