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Big Magic

Creative Living Beyond Fear

The instant #1 NEW YORK TIMES Bestseller

Named a Hot Fall Read by USA Today, Vanity Fair, Newsday, O Magazine, the Seattle Times, Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Mashable, Pop Sugar, and theSan Antonio Express-News

Named a Best Book of the Year by Brainpickings and Book Riot

"A must read for anyone hoping to live a creative life... I dare you not to be inspired to be brave, to be free, and to be curious." -PopSugar

From the worldwide bestselling author of Eat Pray Love: the path to the vibrant, fulfilling life you've dreamed of.

Readers of all ages and walks of life have drawn inspiration and empowerment from Elizabeth Gilbert's books for years. Now this beloved author digs deep into her own generative process to share her wisdom and unique perspective about creativity. With profound empathy and radiant generosity, she offers potent insights into the mysterious nature of inspiration. She asks us to embrace our curiosity and let go of needless suffering. She shows us how to tackle what we most love, and how to face down what we most fear. She discusses the attitudes, approaches, and habits we need in order to live our most creative lives. Balancing between soulful spirituality and cheerful pragmatism, Gilbert encourages us to uncover the "strange jewels" that are hidden within each of us. Whether we are looking to write a book, make art, find new ways to address challenges in our work, embark on a dream long deferred, or simply infuse our everyday lives with more mindfulness and passion, Big Magic cracks open a world of wonder and joy.
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Praise for Big Magic:

The instant #1 Globe and Mail & New York Times Bestseller

"Big Magic is a celebration of a creative life...Gilbert's love of creativity is infectious, and there's a lot of great advice in this sunny book...Gilbert doesn't just call for aspiring artists to speak their truth, however daffy that may appear to others; she is showing them how." -Washington Post

"In [Gilbert's] first foray into full-on self-help [she] shares intimate glimpses into the life of a world-famous creative, complete with bouts of paralyzing fear and frustration, in an attempt to coax the rest of us into walking through the world just a little bit braver." -Elle

"The Eat, Pray, Love author demystifies the tricky business of creativity. We're all ears." -Cosmopolitan

"Elizabeth Gilbert is my new spirit animal... I have profoundly changed my approach to creating since I read this book." -Huffington Post

"Gilbert leads readers through breaking out of their own creative ruts, finding fulfillment, and facing fear while finding balance between our spiritual and pragmatic beings in her forth coming book. Yes, please." -Bustle

"Big Magic will resonate with writers and artists who find the process of producing work to be particularly painful...Through anecdotes about her creative failures and resourcefulness, as well as those other artists, Gilbert encourages readers to pursue a creative life 'that is driven more strongly by curiosity than by fear." -Daily Beast

"Gilbert demystifies the creative process, examining the practices of great artists to shed light on finding inspiration in the every day." -Harper's Bazaar

"Part inspiration, part how-to, it offers up both a philosophy of creativity and advice for living a more creatively fulfilling life."-Fast Company

"Big Magic tackles the challenges of living the creative life...Reading it is a little like having a coach by your side, cheering on your efforts - whatever they are - candidly and selflessly." -Christian Science Monitor

"Gilbert [writes] with sincerity and humility about the joy that creativity has given her... If you enjoyed Eat Pray Love, if you are drawn to self-help or inspirational books, or if you just like to bask in another person's positive glow, you'll love Big Magic." -Minneapolis Star-Tribune

"Big Magic wants to help its readers live creatively...[Gilbert believes] creativity is inside all of us, it should be expressed, and it is not selfish or crazy or foolish to do so - it is in fact the best way to live a satisfying life...[Big Magic] constitutes good advice...[in a voice that's] charming, personable, self-aware, jokey, conversational....[and] that Gilbert does so well." -New York Times Book Review

"A lucid and luminous inquiry into the relationship between human beings and the mysteries of the creative experience... What makes her book so immensely helpful is precisely its lived and living nature...wholly electrifying." -Brainpickings

"Gilbert tackles heavy, sensitive subject matter but keeps it light, making what's essentially a self-help book feel like a good talk with a friend rather than a sermon."-Associated Press

"Transformative." -Flavorwire

"Gilbert's trademark warmth and enthusiasm abounds...wise...[and] pointed." -Boston Globe

"Part pat-on-the-back, part slap-in-the-face, [Big Magic is] a permission slip for readers to stop making excuses and get to work... a fresh and modern surprise that fans of her work will relish." -Wichita Eagle

"Funny. Insightful. Honest. Irreverent...But, of course, most of us have read Gilbert before and these qualities find their way into all of her works. The particular form of magic in Big Magic comes in a very unusual wrapping: hope and love...Big Magic read[s] like a devotional. Like a love letter to the earnest artist inside most of our hearts." -Books and Whatnot

"Distinctly refreshing." -TED Ideas Blog

"Big Magic will leave you feeling inspired to be curious, brave, fr
Portrait
Elizabeth Gilbert is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Eat Pray Love and several other internationally bestselling books of fiction and nonfiction. Gilbert began her career writing for Harper's Bazaar, Spin, The New York Times Magazine and GQ, and was a three-time finalist for the National Magazine Award. Her story collection Pilgrims was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway award; The Last American Man was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. The follow-up memoir Committed became an instant #1 New York Times bestseller. Her latest novel, The Signature of All Things, was named a Best Book of 2013 by The New York Times, O Magazine, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, and The New Yorker. Gilbert's short fiction has appeared in Esquire, Story, One Story, and the Paris Review.

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  • Once upon a time, there was a man named Jack Gilbert, who was not related to me-unfortunately for me.

    Jack Gilbert was a great poet, but if you've never heard of him, don't worry about it. It's not your fault. He never much cared about being known. But I knew about him, and I loved him dearly from a respectful distance, so let me tell you about him.

    Jack Gilbert was born in Pittsburgh in 1925 and grew up in the midst of that city's smoke, noise, and industry. He worked in factories and steel mills as a young man, but was called from an early age to write poetry. He answered the call without hesitation. He became a poet the way other men become monks: as a devotional practice, as an act of love, and as a lifelong commitment to the search for grace and transcendence. I think this is probably a very good way to become a poet. Or to become anything, really, that calls to your heart and brings you to life.

    Jack could've been famous, but he wasn't into it. He had the talent and the charisma for fame, but he never had the interest. His first collection, published in 1962, won the prestigious Yale Younger Poets prize and was nominated for the Pulitzer. What's more, he won over audiences as well as critics, which is not an easy feat for a poet in the modern world. There was something about him that drew people in and kept them captivated. He was handsome, passionate, sexy, brilliant on stage. He was a magnet for women and an idol for men. He was photographed for Vogue, looking gorgeous and romantic. People were crazy about him. He could've been a rock star.

    Instead, he disappeared. He didn't want to be distractedby too much commotion. Later in life he reported that he had found his fame boring-not because it was immoral or corrupting, but simply because it was exactly the same thing every day. He was looking for something richer, more textured, more varied. So he dropped out. He went to live in Europe and stayed there for twenty years. He lived for a while in Italy, a while in Denmark, but mostly he lived in a shepherd's hut on a mountaintop in Greece. There, he contemplated the eternal mysteries, watched the light change, and wrote his poems in private. He had his love stories, his obstacles, his victories. He was happy. He got by somehow, making a living here and there. He needed little. He allowed his name to be forgotten.

    After two decades, Jack Gilbert resurfaced and publishedanother collection of poems. Again, the literary world fellin love with him. Again, he could have been famous. Again,he disappeared-this time for a decade. This would be hispattern always: isolation, followed by the publication ofsomething sublime, followed by more isolation. He was likea rare orchid, with blooms separated by many years. Henever promoted himself in the least. (In one of the few interviewshe ever gave, Gilbert was asked how he thoughthis detachment from the publishing world had affected hiscareer. He laughed and said, "I suppose it's been fatal.")

    The only reason I ever heard of Jack Gilbert was that, quite late in his life, he returned to America and-for motives I will never know-took a temporary teaching position in the creative writing department at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. The following year, 2005, it happened that I took exactly the same job. (Around campus,they started jokingly calling the position "the Gilbert Chair.") I found Jack Gilbert's books in my office-the office that had once been his. It was almost like the room was still warm from his presence. I read his poems and was overcome by their grandeur, and by how much his writing reminded me of Whitman. ("We must risk delight," he wrote. "We must have the stubbornness to accept our gladness in the ruthless furnace of this world.")

    He and I had the same surname, we'd held the same job, we had inhabited the same office, we had taught many ofthe same students, and now I was in love with his words; naturally enough, I beca
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 304
Erscheinungsdatum 27.09.2016
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-7352-1417-0
Verlag Penguin LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 17.5/10.6/2.7 cm
Gewicht 149 g
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Fr. 13.90
Fr. 13.90
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