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Ill Will

A Novel

NATIONAL BESTSELLER - Two sensational unsolved crimes-one in the past, another in the present-are linked by one man's memory and self-deception in this chilling novel of literary suspense from National Book Award finalist Dan Chaon.

A NEW YORK TIMES AND WASHINGTON POST NOTABLE BOOK - NAMED ONE OF THE 10 BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY PUBLISHERS WEEKLY AND KIRKUS REVIEWS

"We are always telling a story to ourselves, about ourselves." This is one of the little mantras Dustin Tillman likes to share with his patients, and it's meant to be reassuring. But what if that story is a lie?

A psychologist in suburban Cleveland, Dustin is drifting through his forties when he hears the news: His adopted brother, Rusty, is being released from prison. Thirty years ago, Rusty received a life sentence for the massacre of Dustin's parents, aunt, and uncle. The trial came to epitomize the 1980s hysteria over Satanic cults; despite the lack of physical evidence, the jury believed the outlandish accusations Dustin and his cousin made against Rusty. Now, after DNA analysis has overturned the conviction, Dustin braces for a reckoning.

Meanwhile, one of Dustin's patients has been plying him with stories of the drowning deaths of a string of drunk college boys. At first Dustin dismisses his patient's suggestions that a serial killer is at work as paranoid thinking, but as the two embark on an amateur investigation, Dustin starts to believe that there's more to the deaths than coincidence. Soon he becomes obsessed, crossing all professional boundaries-and putting his own family in harm's way.

From one of today's most renowned practitioners of literary suspense, Ill Will is an intimate thriller about the failures of memory and the perils of self-deception. In Dan Chaon's nimble, chilling prose, the past looms over the present, turning each into a haunted place.

Praise for Ill Will

"In his haunting, strikingly original new novel, [Dan] Chaon takes formidable risks, dismantling his timeline like a film editor."-The New York Times Book Review

"The scariest novel of the year . . . ingenious . . . Chaon's novel walks along a garrote stretched taut between Edgar Allan Poe and Alfred Hitchcock."-The Washington Post
Rezension
"In his haunting, strikingly original new novel, [Dan] Chaon takes formidable risks, dismantling his timeline like a film editor and building the narrative with short, urgent chapters told from a few key perspectives. . . . As the story spins toward its inexorable conclusion, only the reader ascertains what is happening-a sinking realization that rattles the psyche and interferes with sleep. I read the concluding sections with increasing horror; the ending, twisting in the author's assured hands like a Rubik's Cube, is at once predictable and harrowing. Somehow, it resolved nothing and left me shaken. I believed this could happen-I believed all of it-and the only thing more terrifying than that is the possibility of another Dan Chaon novel. I will be nervously looking forward to it."-The New York Times Book Review

"The scariest novel of the year . . . ingenious . . . By now we should all be on guard against Dan Chaon, but there's just no effective defense against this cunning writer. The author of three novels and three collections of short stories, he draws on our sympathies even while pricking our anxieties. Before beginning his exceptionally unnerving new book, go ahead and lock the door, but it won't help. You'll still be stuck inside yourself, which for Chaon is the most precarious place to be. . . . There's something irresistibly creepy about this story, which stems from the thrill of venturing into illicit places of the mind. . . . Chaon's novel walks along a garrote stretched taut between Edgar Allan Poe and Alfred Hitchcock. By the time we realize what's happening, we've gone too far to turn back. We can only inch forward into the darkness, bracing for what might come next."-The Washington Post

"Powerful . . . Chaon is one of America's best and most dependable writers, and in the end, Ill Will is a ruthlessly 'realistic' piece of fiction about the unrealistic beliefs people entertain about their world."-Los Angeles Times

"Spanning more than thirty years, this intriguing novel about a tightly wired criminal psychologist with a murky past has the tension of a thriller plus the emotional release of justice finally served."-O: The Oprah Magazine

"Powerfully unsettling . . . A ranking master among neo-pulp stylists, Chaon adds to the book's disorienting effects by playing with the physical text. Some chapters take the form of parallel columns, two or three to a page. White spaces and uneven alignments push words, sentences-and thoughts-apart. . . . While such touches underscore the author's playful approach, the writerly stagecraft keeps the reader off guard and sometimes on edge, in a kind of altered cognitive state. There's a lot going on under the surface of Ill Will-more than one reading will reveal. Going back and reading this oddly compelling book again will only provide more pleasure."-Chicago Tribune

"Terrifically eerie . . . The thriller transcends its genre to become a fascinating study in generational trauma. . . . Too few writers prize atmosphere as much as narrative tautness. With Ill Will, Chaon succeeds at delivering both."-The Dallas Morning News

"Outstanding . . . Following writers like Richard Matheson and Shirley Jackson, Dan Chaon writes in the spooky tradition of suburban gothic. . . . An unreliable narrator can often feel like a cheap trick in the novelist's playbook, but Mr. Chaon employs it masterfully, integrating unreliability into the book's very typography. . . . Mr. Chaon's writing is cool and precise, but his story is thrillingly unstable. It also boasts, at the end, a traditional horror-novel payoff I didn't see coming-Stephen King couldn't have done it better."-The Wall Street Journal

"One of the best thrillers I've encountered in a very, very long time, Dan Chaon's latest novel will chill you to the bone and keep you guessing at every turn."-Newsweek

"If you're up for being caught in a seamy heartland underbelly of fear, superstition, and paranoia, with side excursio
Portrait
Dan Chaon is the acclaimed author of Among the Missing, which was a finalist for the National Book Award; You Remind Me of Me, which was named one of the best books of the year by The Washington Post, San Francisco Chronicle, and Entertainment Weekly, among other publications; Await Your Reply, which was a New York Times Notable Book and appeared on more than a dozen best-of-the-year lists; and Stay Awake. Chaon has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award in Fiction, and he was the recipient of the 2006 Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He lives in Cleveland, Ohio, and teaches at Oberlin College, where he is the Pauline M. Delaney Professor of Creative Writing.
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    Sometime in the first days of November the body of the young man who had disappeared sank to the bottom of the river. Facedown, bumping lightly against the muddy bed below the flowing water, the body was probably carried for several miles-frowning with gentle surprise, arms held a little away from his sides, legs stiff. The underwater plants ran their fronds along the feathered headdress the boy was wearing, across the boy's forehead and war-paint stripes and lips, down across the fringed buckskin shirt and wolf-tooth necklace, across loincloth and deerskin leggings, tracing the feet in their moccasins. The fish and other scavengers were mostly asleep during this period. The body bumped against rocks and branches, scraped along gravel, but it was mostly preserved. In April, when the two freshman college girls saw the boy's face under the thin layer of ice among the reeds and cattails at the edge of the old skating pond, they at first imagined the corpse was a discarded mannequin or a plastic Halloween mask. They were collecting pond-water specimens for their biology course, and both of them were feeling scientific rather than superstitious, and one of the girls reached down and touched the face's cheek with the eraser tip of her pencil.

    During this same period of months, November through April, Dustin Tillman had been drifting along his own trajectory. He was forty-one years old, married with two teenage sons, a psychologist with a small practice and formerly, he sometimes told people, some occasional forays into forensics. His life, he thought, was a collection of the usual stuff: driving to and from work, listening to the radio, checking and answering his steadily accumulating email, shopping at the supermarket, and watching select highly regarded shows on television and reading a few books that had been well reviewed and helping the boys with their homework, details that were-he was increasingly aware-units of measurement by which he was parceling out his life.

    When his cousin Kate called him, later that week after the body was found, he was already feeling a lot of vague anxiety. He was having a hard time about his upcoming birthday, which, he realized, seemed like a very bourgeois and mundane thing to worry about. He had recently quit smoking, so there was that, too. Without nicotine, his brain seemed murky with circling, unfocused dread, and the world itself appeared somehow more unfriendly-emanating, he couldn't help but think, a soft glow of ill will.

    2

    A few days after the body was discovered, Dustin picked up the phone and it was his cousin Kate calling from Los Angeles.

    "Listen," she said. "I have some very weird news."

    Dustin said: "Kate?" They spoke regularly enough, once every few months or so, but it was usually on birthdays or holidays or around the edges of holidays.

    "It's about Russell," she said.

    "Russell, my brother Russell?" He was sitting at the desk in his office, his "study," as he liked to call it, on the third floor of the house, and he stopped typing on the computer and glanced over at his ashtray, which was now full of little sugar-free hard candies, lozenges wrapped in cellophane. "Don't tell me," Dustin said. "He's escaped."

    "Just listen," Kate said.

    Dustin hadn't spoken to Russell, his adopted older brother, since Russell had been sent to prison. He had not written to him or even kept tabs on him, really, and the thoughts that he had of him were of the most cursory sort. For example, he'd see a movie or a TV show that took place in a prison and he'd think: I wonder what Russell is doing right now?

    He had a general idea of what prison would be like. This included things like homosexual rape and "shanks" carved out of toothbrushes or spoons.
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband gebundene Ausgabe
Seitenzahl 496
Erscheinungsdatum 07.03.2017
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-345-47604-3
Verlag Random House US
Maße (L/B/H) 24.4/15.9/4.3 cm
Gewicht 701 g
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
Fr. 37.90
Fr. 37.90
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
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