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Akata Witch

"Nnedi Okorafor writes glorious futures and fabulous fantasies. Her characters take your heart and squeeze it; her worlds open your mind to new things." -- Neil Gaiman, author of The Graveyard Book and American Gods

Affectionately dubbed "the Nigerian Harry Potter," Akata Witch weaves together a heart-pounding tale of magic, mystery, and finding one's place in the world. Perfect for fans of Children of Blood and Bone!

Sunny Nwazue lives in Nigeria, but she was born in New York City. Her features are West African, but she's albino. She's a terrific athlete, but can't go out into the sun to play soccer. There seems to be no place where she fits in. And then she discovers something amazing-she is a "free agent" with latent magical power. And she has a lot of catching up to do.
Soon she's part of a quartet of magic students, studying the visible and invisible, learning to change reality. But as she's finding her footing, Sunny and her friends are asked by the magical authorities to help track down a career criminal who knows magic, too. Will their training be enough to help them combat a threat whose powers greatly outnumber theirs?
World Fantasy Award-winning author Nnedi Okorafor blends magic and adventure to create a lush world. Her writing has been called "stunning" by The New York Times and her fans include Neil Gaiman, Rick Riordan, John Green, Ursula K. Le Guin, and many more!

Raves for Nnedi Okorafor's writing:

"There's more imagination on a page of Nnedi Okorafor's work than in whole volumes of ordinary fantasy epics." -Ursula K. Le Guin, award-winning author of A Wizard of Earthsea

"The most imaginative, gripping, enchanting fantasy novels I have ever read!" -Laurie Halse Anderson, National Book Award finalist and New York Times bestselling author of Speak

"I always loved science fiction, but I didn't feel I was part of it-until I read first Octavia Butler, and now Nnedi Okorafor." -Whoopi Goldberg

"Highly original stuff, episode after amazing episode, full of color, life, and death. Nnedi Okorafor's work is wonderful!" -Diana Wynne Jones, award-winning author of The Chronicles of Chrestomanci

"Jam-packed with mythological wonders." -Rick Riordan, #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series

"Okorafor's imagination is stunning." -The New York Times Book Review

Rezension
Raves for Nnedi Okorafor's Writing

"Nnedi Okorafor writes glorious futures and fabulous fantasies. Her characters take your heart and squeeze it, her worlds open your mind to new things, always rooted in the red clay of reality."-Neil Gaiman, Newbery Award-winning author of The Graveyard Book

"There's more imagination on a page of Nnedi Okorafor's work than in whole volumes of ordinary fantasy epics."-Ursula K. Le Guin, award-winning author of A Wizard of Earthsea

"The most imaginative, gripping, enchanting fantasy novels I have ever read!"-Laurie Halse Anderson, National Book Award finalist and New York Times bestselling author of Speak

"I always loved science fiction, but I didn't feel I was part of it-until I read first Octavia Butler, and now Nnedi Okorafor."-Whoopi Goldberg

"Highly original stuff, episode after amazing episode, full of color, life, and death. Nnedi Okorafor's work is wonderful!"-Diana Wynne Jones, award-winning author of The Chronicles of Chrestomanci

"Jam-packed with mythological wonders."-Rick Riordan, #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series

"Okorafor's imagination is stunning."-The New York Times Book Review

"A marvelous and uplifting read, heartwarming in its portrayal of true friendship, heartbreaking in its portrayal of headstrong youth and the perils of pride."-Cory Doctorow, award-winning author of Little Brother

"Fresh, original, and smart. We need more writers like her."-Patrick Rothfuss, author of The Name of the Wind

"Nnedi Okorafor is opening doors into strange and beautiful new worlds. Her heroes are beguiling, her magic firmly rooted in real places and real things. Rich, mysterious, and convincing, Akata Witch takes fantasy in a haunting new direction."-Jonathan Stroud, New York Times bestselling author of The Bartimaeus Trilogy

"The voice of Nnedi Okorafor does not obey the rules of distance, time, or place. Hers is the voice that fuses matter and imagination. She shows us just how close we are to that alternate reality."-Tchidi Chikere, Nigerian award-winning film director and screenwriter
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  • This excerpt is from an advance uncorrected copy proof

    Copyright © 2017 Nnedi Okorafor

    Prologue

    The Candle

    I've always been fascinated by candles. Looking into the flame calms me down. Here in Nigeria, PHC is always taking the lights, so I keep candles in my room just in case.

    PHC stands for "Power Holding Company of Nigeria," but people like to say it really stands for "Please Hold Candles in Nigeria." Back in Chicago we had National Grid, and the electricity was always working. Not here, though. Not yet. Maybe in the future.

    One night, after the power went out, I lit a candle as usual. Then, also as usual, I got down on the floor and just gazed at its flame.

    My candle was white and thick, like the ones in church.

    I lay on my belly and just stared and stared into it. So orange, like the abdomen of a firefly. It was nice and soothing until . . . it started flickering.

    Then, I thought I saw something. Something serious and big and scary. I moved closer.

    The candle just flickered like any other flame. I moved even closer, until the flame was an inch from my eyes. I could see something. I moved closer still. I was almost there. I was just starting to understand what I saw when the flame kissed something above my head. Then the smell hit me and the room was suddenly bright yellow orange! My hair was on fire!

    I screamed and smacked my head as hard as I could. My burning hair singed my hand. Next thing I knew, my mother was there. She tore off her rapa and threw it over my head.

    The electricity suddenly came back on. My brothers ran in, then my father. The room smelled awful. My hair was half gone and my hands were tender.

    That night, my mother cut my hair. Seventy percent of my lovely long hair, gone. But it was what I saw in that candle that stayed with me most. I'd seen the end of the world in its flame. Raging fires, boiling oceans, toppled sky- scrapers, ruptured land, dead and dying people. It was horrible. And it was coming.

    My name is Sunny Nwazue and I confuse people.

    I have two older brothers. Like my parents, my brothers were both born here in Nigeria. Then my family moved to America, where I was born in the city of New York. When I was nine, we returned to Nigeria, near the town of Aba. My parents felt it would be a better place to raise my brothers and me, at least that's what my mom says. We're Igbo-that's an ethnic group from Nigeria-so I'm American and Igbo, I guess. You see why I confuse people? I'm Nigerian by blood, American by birth, and Nigerian again because I live here. I have West African features, like my mother, but while the rest of my family is dark brown, I've got light yellow hair, skin the color of "sour milk" (or so stupid people like to tell me), and hazel eyes that look like God ran out of the right color. I'm albino.

    Being albino made the sun my enemy; my skin burned so easily that I felt nearly flammable. That's why, though I was really good at soccer, I couldn't join the boys when they played after school. Although they wouldn't have let me anyway, me being a girl. Very narrow-minded. I had to play at night, with my brothers, when they felt like it.

    Of course, this was all before that afternoon with Chichi and Orlu, when everything changed.

    I look back now and see that there were signs of what was to come.

    When I was two, during a brief visit to Nigeria with my family, I contracted malaria. It was a bad case and I almost died from it when I got back to the States. I remember. My brothers used to tell me that I was a freak because I could remember so far back.

    I was really hot, absolutely burning up with fever. My mother stood over my bed, crying. I don't remember my father being there much. My brothers would come in once in a while and pat my forehead or kiss my cheeks.

    I was like that for days. Then a light came to me, like a tiny yellow flame or sun. It was laughing and warm-but a nice kind of warm, like bathwater that has been sit
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 384
Altersempfehlung 12 - 15
Erscheinungsdatum 11.07.2017
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-14-242091-1
Verlag Penguin LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 20.8/13.9/2.7 cm
Gewicht 344 g
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Fr. 17.90
Fr. 17.90
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
zzgl. Versandkosten
Versandfertig innert 1 - 2 Werktagen,  Kostenlose Lieferung ab Fr.  30 i
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Kostenlose Lieferung ab Fr.  30 i
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