Warenkorb
 

Profitieren Sie im Juli von 5-fach Meilen auf Bücher & eBooks!*

The Name of the Wind: 10th Anniversary Deluxe Edition

Kingkiller Chronicle: Book 1

Die Königsmörder-Chronik Band 1

"No one writes about stories like Pat Rothfuss. How the right story at the right time can change the world, how the teller can shape a life." -Lin-Manuel Miranda

This deluxe, illustrated edition celebrates the New York Times-bestselling series, The Kingkiller Chronicle-a masterful epic fantasy saga that has inspired readers worldwide.

This anniversary hardcover includes more than 50 pages of extra content!
• Beautiful, iconic cover by artist Sam Weber and designer Paul Buckley
• Gorgeous, never-before-seen illustrations by artist Dan Dos Santos
• Detailed and updated world map by artist Nate Taylor
• Brand-new author's note
• Appendix detailing calendar system and currencies
• Pronunciation guide of names and places

DAY ONE: THE NAME OF THE WIND

My name is Kvothe.

I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during day. I have talked to Gods, loved women, and written songs that make the minstrels weep.

You may have heard of me.

So begins a tale unequaled in fantasy literature-the story of a hero told in his own voice. It is a tale of sorrow, a tale of survival, a tale of one man's search for meaning in his universe, and how that search, and the indomitable will that drove it, gave birth to a legend.

Praise for The Kingkiller Chronicle:

"The best epic fantasy I read last year.... He's bloody good, this Rothfuss guy."
-George R. R. Martin, New York Times-bestselling author of A Song of Ice and Fire

"Rothfuss has real talent, and his tale of Kvothe is deep and intricate and wondrous."
-Terry Brooks, New York Times-bestselling author of Shannara

"It is a rare and great pleasure to find a fantasist writing...with true music in the words."
-Ursula K. Le Guin, award-winning author of Earthsea

"The characters are real and the magic is true."
-Robin Hobb, New York Times-bestselling author of Assassin's Apprentice

"Masterful.... There is a beauty to Pat's writing that defies description."
-Brandon Sanderson, New York Times-bestselling author of Mistborn
Rezension
"Rothfuss' Kingkiller books are among the most read and re-read in our home. It's a world you want to spend lifetimes in, as his many fans will attest."
-Lin-Manuel Miranda, Pulitzer Prize-winning creator of Hamilton

"The best epic fantasy I read last year.... He's bloody good, this Rothfuss guy."
-George R. R. Martin, New York Times-bestselling author of A Song of Ice and Fire

"Rothfuss has real talent, and his tale of Kvothe is deep and intricate and wondrous."
-Terry Brooks, New York Times-bestselling author of Shannara

"It is a rare and great pleasure to find a fantasist writing...with true music in the words."
-Ursula K. LeGuin, award-winning author of Earthsea

"The characters are real and the magic is true."
-Robin Hobb, New York Times-bestselling author of Assassin's Apprentice

"Masterful.... There is a beauty to Pat's writing that defies description."
-Brandon Sanderson, New York Times-bestselling author of Mistborn

"[Makes] you think he's inventing the genre, instead of reinventing it."
-Lev Grossman, New York Times-bestselling author of The Magicians

"This is a magnificent book."
-Anne McCaffrey, award-winning author of the Dragonriders of Pern

"The great new fantasy writer we've been waiting for, and this is an astonishing book."
-Orson Scott Card, New York Times-bestselling author of Ender's Game

"It's not the fantasy trappings (as wonderful as they are) that make this novel so good, but what the author has to say about true, common things, about ambition and failure, art, love, and loss."
-Tad Williams, New York Times-bestselling author of Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn

"Jordan and Goodkind must be looking nervously over their shoulders!"
-Kevin J. Anderson, New York Times-bestselling author of The Dark Between the Stars

"An extremely immersive story set in a flawlessly constructed world and told extremely well."
-Jo Walton, award-winning author of Among Others

"Hail Patrick Rothfuss! A new giant is striding the land."
-Robert J. Sawyer, award-winning author of Wake

"Fans of the epic high fantasies of George R.R. Martin or J.R.R. Tolkien will definitely want to check out Patrick Rothfuss' The Name of the Wind."
-NPR

"Shelve The Name of the Wind beside The Lord of the Rings...and look forward to the day when it's mentioned in the same breath, perhaps as first among equals."
-The A.V. Club

"I was reminded of Ursula K. Le Guin, George R. R. Martin, and J. R. R. Tolkein, but never felt that Rothfuss was imitating anyone."
-The London Times

"This fast-moving, vivid, and unpretentious debut roots its coming-of-age fantasy in convincing mythology."
-Entertainment Weekly

"This breathtakingly epic story is heartrending in its intimacy and masterful in its narrative essence."
-Publishers Weekly (starred)

"Reminiscent in scope of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series...this masterpiece of storytelling will appeal to lovers of fantasy on a grand scale."
-Library Journal (starred)
Portrait
Patrick Rothfuss is the bestselling author of The Kingkiller Chronicle. His first novel, The Name of the Wind, won the Quill Award and was a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year. Its sequel, The Wise Man's Fear, debuted at #1 on The New York Times bestseller chart and won the David Gemmell Legend Award. His novels have appeared on NPR's Top 100 Science Fiction/Fantasy Books list and Locus' Best 21st Century Fantasy Novels list. Pat lives in Wisconsin, where he brews mead, builds box forts with his children, and runs Worldbuilders, a book-centered charity that has raised more than six million dollars for Heifer International. He can be found at patrickrothfuss.com and on Twitter at @patrickrothfuss.
… weiterlesen
  • Artikelbild-0
  • PROLOGUE
    A Silence of Three Parts

    It was night again. The Waystone Inn lay in silence, and it was a silence of three parts.

    The most obvious part was a hollow, echoing quiet, made by things that were lacking. If there had been a wind it would have sighed through the trees, set the inn's sign creaking on its hooks, and brushed the silence down the road like trailing autumn leaves. If there had been a crowd, even a handful of men inside the inn, they would have filled the silence with conversation and laughter, the clatter and clamor one expects from a drinking house during the dark hours of night. If there had been music...but no, of course there was no music. In fact there were none of these things, and so the silence remained.

    Inside the Waystone a pair of men huddled at one corner of the bar. They drank with quiet determination, avoiding serious discussions of troubling news. In doing this they added a small, sullen silence to the larger, hollow one. It made an alloy of sorts, a counterpoint.

    The third silence was not an easy thing to notice. If you listened for an hour, you might begin to feel it in the wooden floor underfoot and in the rough, splintering barrels behind the bar. It was in the weight of the black stone hearth that held the heat of a long dead fire. It was in the slow back and forth of a white linen cloth rubbing along the grain of the bar. And it was in the hands of the man who stood there, polishing a stretch of mahogany that already gleamed in the lamplight.

    The man had true-red hair, red as flame. His eyes were dark and distant, and he moved with the subtle certainty that comes from knowing many things.

    The Waystone was his, just as the third silence was his. This was appropriate, as it was the greatest silence of the three, wrapping the others inside itself. It was deep and wide as autumn's ending. It was heavy as a great river-smooth stone. It was the patient, cut-flower sound of a man who is waiting to die.

    CHAPTER ONE
    A Place for Demons

    It was Felling Night, and the usual crowd had gathered at the Waystone Inn. Five wasn't much of a crowd, but five was as many as the Waystone ever saw these days, times being what they were.

    Old Cob was filling his role as storyteller and advice dispensary. The men at the bar sipped their drinks and listened. In the back room a young innkeeper stood out of sight behind the door, smiling as he listened to the details of a familiar story.

    "When he awoke, Taborlin the Great found himself locked in a high tower. They had taken his sword and stripped him of his tools: key, coin, and candle were all gone. But that weren't even the worst of it, you see..." Cob paused for effect, "...cause the lamps on the wall were burning blue!"

    Graham, Jake, and Shep nodded to themselves. The three friends had grown up together, listening to Cob's stories and ignoring his advice.

    Cob peered closely at the newer, more attentive member of his small audience, the smith's prentice. "Do you know what that meant, boy?" Everyone called the smith's prentice "boy" despite the fact that he was a hand taller than anyone there. Small towns being what they are, he would most likely remain "boy" until his beard filled out or he bloodied someone's nose over the matter.

    The boy gave a slow nod. "The Chandrian."

    "That's right," Cob said approvingly. "The Chandrian. Everyone knows that blue fire is one of their signs. Now he was-"

    "But how'd they find him?" the boy interrupted. "And why din't they kill him when they had the chance?"

    "Hush now, you'll get all the answers before the end," Jake said. "Just let him tell it."

    "No need for all that, Jake," Graham said. "Boy's just curious. Drink your drink."

    "I drank me drink already," Jake grumbled. "I need t'nother but the innkeep's still skinning rats in the back room." He raised his voice and knocked his empty mug hollowly on
In den Warenkorb

Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband gebundene Ausgabe
Seitenzahl 752
Erscheinungsdatum 03.10.2017
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-7564-1371-2
Verlag Penguin LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 23.6/15.9/6 cm
Gewicht 1147 g
Auflage 10th Anniversary Deluxe Edition
Illustrator Dan Dos Santos
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
Fr. 48.90
Fr. 48.90
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
Versandfertig innert 1 - 2 Werktagen Versandkostenfrei
Versandfertig innert 1 - 2 Werktagen
Versandkostenfrei
In den Warenkorb
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback!
Entschuldigung, beim Absenden Ihres Feedbacks ist ein Fehler passiert. Bitte versuchen Sie es erneut.
Ihr Feedback zur Seite
Haben Sie alle relevanten Informationen erhalten?

Weitere Bände von Die Königsmörder-Chronik

  • Band 1

    55627018
    The Name of the Wind: 10th Anniversary Deluxe Edition
    von Patrick Rothfuss
    (3)
    Buch
    Fr.48.90
    Sie befinden sich hier
  • Band 2

    14789502
    The Wise Man's Fear
    von Patrick Rothfuss
    (5)
    Buch
    Fr.39.90

Kundenbewertungen

Durchschnitt
3 Bewertungen
Übersicht
3
0
0
0
0

Sooo pretty!!
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 17.01.2018

The stunning cover design, the pretty deep red edge and the beautiful black & white illustrations make this book the perfect gift for every "Kingkiller Chronicles"-fan (or fan-to-be ;)). (for the 10th Anniversary Deluxe Edition)

Zeitlose Fantasy
von Mag. Miriam Mairgünther aus Salzburg am 23.08.2011
Bewertet: Einband: gebundene Ausgabe

Es gibt sie doch noch, die klassischen Fantasy-Romane abseits von kulturellen und literarischen Trends. Patrick Rothfuss hat meiner Ansicht nach mit seiner Geschichte über Kvothe ein Meisterwerk geschaffen, das an Ursula K. LeGuins Romane über den Magier Ged erinnert. Inhaltlich enthält das Buch im Grunde nicht viel Neues; es ge... Es gibt sie doch noch, die klassischen Fantasy-Romane abseits von kulturellen und literarischen Trends. Patrick Rothfuss hat meiner Ansicht nach mit seiner Geschichte über Kvothe ein Meisterwerk geschaffen, das an Ursula K. LeGuins Romane über den Magier Ged erinnert. Inhaltlich enthält das Buch im Grunde nicht viel Neues; es geht hauptsächlich um den Schreibstil des Autors und die Art und Weise, wie die Geschichte erzählt wird. Die Hauptfigur ist der Magier Kvothe, der in relativ jungen Jahren schon so viel erlebt hat und der Held zahlreicher Legenden und Gerüchte geworden ist, sodass ihn ein Chronist bittet, sein Leben in eigenen Worten zu erzählen. Den größten Teil des Buches macht nun diese Erzählung in der Ich-Form aus - für mich eine sehr angenehme Abwechslung im Vergleich zu all den Fantasy-Romanen, in denen der Autor ständig zwischen mehreren Perspektiven wechselt. Kvothe ist eigentlich ein klassischer Fantasy-Held - er wird früh zur Waise, muss sich allein in der Großstadt durchschlagen, zeigt aber außergewöhnliche Begabung auf verschiedenen Gebieten und wird schließlich an der Universität angenommen, wo er als jüngster Student beginnt, die Magie zu studieren. Trotz all seiner Dispositionen erscheint er äußerst menschlich, da er immer wieder mit Problemen zu kämpfen hat, die für den Leser in der realen Welt durchaus nachvollziehbar sind, etwa mit seinen ständigen Geldnöten und drohender Armut, wovor ihn auch seine Magie nicht retten kann. Man sieht Kvothe ständig in Gefahr, seine mühsam erkämpfte Position zu verlieren, und allein schon das macht das Buch zu einer spannenden Lektüre, bei der man immer gleich wissen möchte, ob und wie er sich diesmal retten kann. Was "Der Name des Windes" aber vor allem von anderer Fantasy unterscheidet, ist der Schreibstil des Autors, ein für mich sehr wichtiger Faktor, der leider bei vielen Romanen dieses Genres zu kurz kommt. Patrick Rothfuss pflegt eine wunderbare, atmosphärische Sprache weit abseits von einer rein handlungsorientierten Schilderung der Ereignisse. Er nimmt sich viel Zeit, Szenen, Schauplätze und Personen zu beschreiben, ohne dabei ausschweifend zu werden, und er hat ein besonderes Talent dafür, seinen Figuren Individualität zu geben, auch wenn sie nur kurz auftauchen. Trotz der oftmals ernsten Ereignisse kommen Witz und Ironie nicht zu kurz, und Rothfuss lässt es sich nicht nehmen, Kvothe trotz all seiner Begabungen manchmal auf die Nase fallen zu lassen. Auch die Gespräche zwischen den Figuren sind sehr schön beschrieben, vor allem die Dialoge zwischen Kvothe und seiner Angebeteten, die den Formen der hohen Minne zu folgen scheinen, vordergründig sittsam, aber unterschwellig leidenschaftlich. Daher empfehle ich wegen der reichen Sprache des Autors, das Buch, wenn möglich, im Original zu lesen. Für mich einer der herausragenden phantastischen Romane der letzten Jahre, und gleichzeitig ein vielschichtiger und lebendig erzählter Entwicklungsroman, der nicht nur durch den Fantasy-Hintergrund wirkt und wahrscheinlich in zwanzig Jahren noch genauso gut lesbar sein wird wie jetzt.

Die Fantasyneuentdeckung des Jahres 2007!
von hwm am 08.10.2007
Bewertet: Einband: gebundene Ausgabe

Zahlreiche Legenden umranken Kvothe, den berühmt berüchtigtsten Zauberer und Musiker aller Zeiten - Geschichten von Genius, Schönheit und Heldentum sowie Ignoranz, Verrat und abscheulichen Verbrechen. Ein eifriger Chronist will das Gespinst aus Lügen und Wahrheit durchdringen und spürt den Zauberer in einem Provinznest auf, wo ... Zahlreiche Legenden umranken Kvothe, den berühmt berüchtigtsten Zauberer und Musiker aller Zeiten - Geschichten von Genius, Schönheit und Heldentum sowie Ignoranz, Verrat und abscheulichen Verbrechen. Ein eifriger Chronist will das Gespinst aus Lügen und Wahrheit durchdringen und spürt den Zauberer in einem Provinznest auf, wo er in einer Taverne arbeitet und auf das endgültige Vergessen wartet. Nur widerwillig teilt Kvothe seine Erinnerungen. Doch manchmal müssen Helden daran erinnert werden, dass sie Helden sind und gebraucht werden. Wer Scott Lynch, Joe Abercrombie oder Sarah Monette mag, wird von Patrick Rothfuss begeistert sein. Ich wage sogar zu behaupten, dass er qualitätsmäßig eine Stufe höher einzuschätzen ist. Das Buch hat zwei Ebenen: die Gegenwart, in 3. Person gehalten, in der Kvothe ein gebrochener Mann ist und widerwillig seine Memoiren diktiert und Kvothe als Ich-Erzähler, der seine Kindheit als Teil einer Wandertruppe und seine Jugend an der Universität für Magie wiederauferstehen lässt. Mit bewundernswerter Leichtigkeit wechselt Rothfuss zwischen den Ebenen, weckt geschickt die Neugier des Lesers und wird, so nehme ich an, im dritten Band die Gegenwart "weiterlaufen" lassen (nach dem Motto: Memoiren als Therapieform für einen gefallenen Helden). Während die Knochen der Geschichte altbekannt sind, ist ihre Präsentation es nicht. Sie ist voll düsteren Realismus, was durch Kvothe, einen ungewöhnlich undurchsichtigen Hauptcharakter verstärkt wird. Trotz seiner Talente ist er menschlich. Er begeht Fehler, aus Unwissenheit, Arroganz oder Unbesonnenheit (viele seiner späteren Probleme und sein schlechter Ruf gründen darin) und wird durch seine schwierigen Lebensumstände aufgehalten. TNotW ist das erste Fantasybuch, das ich gelesen habe, in dem Geldmangel ein gravierendes Dauerhindernis für den Hauptcharakter ist. Doch gerade diese Menschlichkeit macht Kvothe so sympathisch und obwohl das Buch streckenweise düster ist, wird es durch Lebensfreude gepaart mit unbändiger Wissbegier und intimen Momenten aufgehellt. Einziger Wehmutstropfen ist, dass der Leser wenig von den aktuellen Zuständen in Kvothes Welt erfährt - es gibt allenfalls düstere Andeutungen von einem kürzlich beendeten Bürgerkrieg (an dem Kvothe mitschuld gewesen sein soll) und einer magischen (Monster-)Plage. Aber die gegenwärtige Situation steht auch nicht im Mittelpunkt des Buches, sonders Kvothes Vergangenheit und man darf sich gewiss mehr davon in Band zwei und drei erwarten. THE NAME OF THE WIND ist auf jeder Ebene schön - inhaltlich, stilistisch, emotional. Es ist die Neuentdeckung des Jahres 2007!