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The Mars Room

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • TIME’S #1 FICTION TITLE OF THE YEAR • NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK OF 2018

FINALIST for the MAN BOOKER PRIZE and the NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD

LONGLISTED for the ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL

“Gritty, empathetic, finely rendered, no sugary toppings, and a lot of punches, none of them pulled.” —Margaret Atwood via Twitter

“A page turner…one of those books that enrage you even as they break your heart.” —The New York Times Book Review (cover review)

“Brilliant and devastating…a heartbreaking, true, and nearly flawless novel.” —NPR

“With her richly textured third novel, Kushner certifies her place as one of the great American novelists of the twenty-first century.” —Entertainment Weekly

From twice National Book Award–nominated Rachel Kushner, whose Flamethrowers was called “the best, most brazen, most interesting book of the year” (Kathryn Schulz, New York magazine), comes a spectacularly compelling, heart-stopping novel about a life gone off the rails in contemporary America.

It’s 2003 and Romy Hall is at the start of two consecutive life sentences at Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility, deep in California’s Central Valley. Outside is the world from which she has been severed: the San Francisco of her youth and her young son, Jackson. Inside is a new reality: thousands of women hustling for the bare essentials needed to survive; the bluffing and pageantry and casual acts of violence by guards and prisoners alike; and the deadpan absurdities of institutional living, which Kushner evokes with great humor and precision.

Stunning and unsentimental,
The Mars Room demonstrates new levels of mastery and depth in Kushner’s work. It is audacious and tragic, propulsive and yet beautifully refined. As James Wood said in
The New Yorker, her fiction “succeeds because it is so full of vibrantly different stories and histories, all of them particular, all of them brilliantly alive.”
Portrait
Rachel Kushner is the bestselling author of 
The Flamethrowers, a finalist for the National Book Award and a 
New York Times Top Ten Book of 2013;
Telex from Cuba, a finalist for the National Book Award; and 
The Mars Room. She lives in Los Angeles.
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband gebundene Ausgabe
Seitenzahl 352
Erscheinungsdatum 01.05.2018
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-1-4767-5655-4
Verlag Simon & Schuster N.Y.
Maße (L/B/H) 26.6/17.2/3.8 cm
Gewicht 514 g
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
Fr. 29.90
Fr. 29.90
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inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
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Cold-blooded murder or self-defense?
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 14.06.2019
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Killing your stalker: Cold-blooded murder or self-defense? Romy Hall has been sentenced to two consecutive life-sentences for ending the life of a man whose obsession with her had grown exceedingly troublesome. She could have accepted the consequences, if she didn't have a son to think of. But with her behind bars and noone to ... Killing your stalker: Cold-blooded murder or self-defense? Romy Hall has been sentenced to two consecutive life-sentences for ending the life of a man whose obsession with her had grown exceedingly troublesome. She could have accepted the consequences, if she didn't have a son to think of. But with her behind bars and noone to care for him, she's determined to get out of there. Most of my knowledge about prisons comes from watching shows like "Orange is the New Black" and "Prison Break". So, going into "The Mars Room", I expected it to be something along those lines. But it isn't at all and that's by no means a bad thing. I think it's great that Kushner goes into a different direction here, but I still could not quite get into the story. To me, the book felt all over the place at times and I didn't connect with the characters at all. I don't know if it was her intention to alienate the readers from the characters, but that's what happened in my case. I like that the book is told from multiple points of view, but there's one narrator who has no connection to any of the other characters (that I picked up on) at all, which I found quite confusing. I did enjoy the ending, however. I am kind of on the fence about "The Mars Room". To me, neither the story nor the characters were outstanding, but just okay. However, reading this you inevitably have to think about what's right and wrong, how the system deals with criminals and if the sentences are always justified. And that's what I enjoyed - I just love it, when a book is thought-provoking and forces me to ponder things that I usually don't have a reason to think about.

The Mars Room
von Miss.mesmerized am 14.06.2018
Bewertet: Einband: gebundene Ausgabe

Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility is Romy Hall’s new home, convicted to life sentence. What brought the mother of a young boy to this institution? And how can she cope with the rules that life in prison follows? Romy Hall remembers her life outside, her addiction and most of all The Mars Room where she stripped for a livin... Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility is Romy Hall’s new home, convicted to life sentence. What brought the mother of a young boy to this institution? And how can she cope with the rules that life in prison follows? Romy Hall remembers her life outside, her addiction and most of all The Mars Room where she stripped for a living. This is also where she met the man who was to change her life. Now, her life only consists of surviving, not getting in the way of the leaders or staff who have their own laws behind the bars. Life inside mirrors the outside, there are ruling classes and those ruled. And sometimes both spheres interact – often not for the better. Rachel Kushner paints a blunt picture of life inside a prison. The idea of such a place as somewhere you can become a better person and atone for your wrongdoings is far from what she describes. It is a constant struggle of surviving and of adapting to the unwritten laws. Life is a series of disappointments, visitors who never come, news which do not reach you. And outside, there isn’t much waiting for you either. It wasn’t that easy for me to sympathise with the protagonist Romy. This might be due to her role; even though she is inside, she remains an observer somehow. At the same time, there is so much unsaid about her that makes it difficult to form a whole picture of her. The fact that the reason for her imprisonment isn’t given immediately, on the other hand, adds to the underlying suspense of the novel. Slowly you get closer to the culminating point which reveals what happened. Additionally, the other characters are, obviously, those at the margins of society, people you wouldn’t actually socialise with and which sometimes repel you as a reader. What I really liked is Kushner’s style of writing. The protagonist’s narration flows like a stream of consciousness which makes it quite realistic and lively. Furthermore, she often hints at what is to come without saying too much, just enough to arouse your interest. When Romy talks about her life and most of all about her future, she is quite direct – well, there isn’t much reason to embellish anything and therefore, her words sound absolutely authentic.