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Tuesdays with Morrie

An old man, a young man, and life's greatest lesson

Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher, or a colleague. Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, helped you see the world as a more profound place, gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it.

For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly twenty years ago.

Maybe, like Mitch, you lost track of this mentor as you made your way, and the insights faded, and the world seemed colder. Wouldn't you like to see that person again, ask the bigger questions that still haunt you, receive wisdom for your busy life today the way you once did when you were younger?

Mitch Albom had that second chance. He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man's life. Knowing he was dying, Morrie visited with Mitch in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college. Their rekindled relationship turned into one final "class": lessons in how to live.

Tuesdays with Morrie is a magical chronicle of their time together, through which Mitch shares Morrie's lasting gift with the world.

From the Hardcover edition.
Rezension
"This is a sweet book of a man's love for his mentor. It has a stubborn honesty that nourishes the living."
--Robert Bly, author of Iron John

"A deeply moving account of courage and wisdom, shared by an inveterate mentor looking into the multitextured face of his own death. There is much to be learned by sitting in on this final class."
--Jon Kabat-Zinn, coauthor of Everyday Blessings and Wherever You Go, There You Are

"All of the saints and Buddhas have taught us that wisdom and compassion are one. Now along comes Morrie, who makes it perfectly plain. His living and dying show us the way."
--Joanna Bull, Founder and Executive Director of Gilda's Club
Portrait
Mitch Albom writes for the Detroit Free Press, and has been voted America's No. 1 sports columnist ten times by the Associated Press Sports Editors. Albom, a former professional musician, hosts a daily radio show on WJR in Detroit and appears regularly on ESPN's "The Sports Reporters." He is the author of Bo and Fab Five, both national bestsellers, and has also published four collections of his columns. He lives with his wife, Janine, in Michigan.

From the Hardcover edition.
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  • The Curriculum

    The last class of my old professor's life took place once a week in his house, by a window in the study where he could watch a small hibiscus plant shed its pink leaves. The class met on Tuesdays. It began after breakfast. The subject was The Meaning of Life. It was taught from experience.

    No grades were given, but there were oral exams each week. You were expected to respond to questions, and you were expected to pose questions of your own. You were also required to perform physical tasks now and then, such as lifting the professor's head to a comfortable spot on the pillow or placing his glasses on the bridge of his nose. Kissing him good-bye earned you extra credit.

    No books were required, yet many topics were covered, including love, work, community, family, aging, forgiveness, and, finally, death. The last lecture was brief, only a few words.

    A funeral was held in lieu of graduation.

    Although no final exam was given, you were expected to produce one long paper on what was learned. That paper is presented here.

    The last class of my old professor's life had only one student.

    I was the student.

    It is the late spring of 1979, a hot, sticky Saturday afternoon. Hundreds of us sit together, side by side, in rows of wooden folding chairs on the main campus lawn. We wear blue nylon robes. We listen impatiently to long speeches. When the ceremony is over, we throw our caps in the air, and we are officially graduated from college, the senior class of Brandeis University in the city of Waltham, Massachusetts. For many of us, the curtain has just come down on childhood.

    Afterward, I find Morrie Schwartz, my favorite professor, and introduce him to my parents. He is a small man who takes small steps, as if a strong wind could, at any time, whisk him up into the clouds. In his graduation day robe, he looks like a cross between a biblical prophet and a Christmas elf. He has sparkling blue-green eyes, thinning silver hair that spills onto his forehead, big ears, a triangular nose, and tufts of graying eyebrows. Although his teeth are crooked and his lower ones are slanted back--as if someone had once punched them in--when he smiles it's as if you'd just told him the first joke on earth.

    He tells my parents how I took every class he taught. He tells them, "You have a special boy here." Embarrassed, I look at my feet. Before we leave, I hand my professor a present, a tan briefcase with his initials on the front. I bought this the day before at a shopping mall. I didn't want to forget him. Maybe I didn't want him to forget me.

    "Mitch, you are one of the good ones," he says, admiring the briefcase. Then he hugs me. I feel his thin arms around my back. I am taller than he is, and when he holds me, I feel awkward, older, as if I were the parent and he were the child.

    He asks if I will stay in touch, and without hesitation I say, "Of course."

    When he steps back, I see that he is crying.

    The Syllabus

    His death sentence came in the summer of 1994. Looking back, Morrie knew something bad was coming long before that. He knew it the day he gave up dancing.

    He had always been a dancer, my old professor. The music didn't matter. Rock and roll, big band, the blues. He loved them all. He would close his eyes and with a blissful smile begin to move to his own sense of rhythm. It wasn't always pretty. But then, he didn't worry about a partner. Morrie danced by himself.

    He used to go to this church in Harvard Square every Wednesday night for something called "Dance Free." They had flashing lights and booming speakers and Morrie would wander in among the mostly student crowd, wearing a white T-shirt and black sweatpants and a towel around his neck, and whatever music was playing, that's the music to which he danced. He'd do the lindy to Jimi Hendrix. He twisted and twirled, he waved his arms
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 208
Erscheinungsdatum 01.01.2006
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-385-49649-0
Verlag Random House LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 17.7/10.7/1.7 cm
Gewicht 111 g
Verkaufsrang 12247
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Fr. 13.90
Fr. 13.90
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
zzgl. Versandkosten
Versandfertig innert 1 - 2 Werktagen,  Kostenlose Lieferung ab Fr.  30 i
Versandfertig innert 1 - 2 Werktagen
Kostenlose Lieferung ab Fr.  30 i
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Eine wahre Geschichte über die wahren Werte...
von Eva am 29.08.2015

"Dying is only one thing to be sad over. Living unhappily is something else." - Morrie Schwartz Eine wunderschöne und kluge Geschichte über die wahren Werte im Leben, die einen einerseits zum Nachdenken und andererseits - man möchte es nicht vermuten - zum Schmunzeln anregt. Das liegt sicher nicht nur an Mitch Alboms Er... "Dying is only one thing to be sad over. Living unhappily is something else." - Morrie Schwartz Eine wunderschöne und kluge Geschichte über die wahren Werte im Leben, die einen einerseits zum Nachdenken und andererseits - man möchte es nicht vermuten - zum Schmunzeln anregt. Das liegt sicher nicht nur an Mitch Alboms Erzählweise, sondern vor allem an Morries humorvoller und spitzbübischer Art, die einen - trotz der teilweise schweren Themen (Krankheit, Angst vor dem Älterwerden, Tod) - immer wieder daran erinnert, dass man sich selbst und das Leben manchmal nicht zu ernst nehmen sollte. Pluspunkt: Ich habe mich seit langem wieder einmal dazu entschlossen ein Buch auf Englisch zu lesen und deshalb hat es mich umso mehr gefreut, dass es auch in der Originalsprache sehr leicht zu verstehen ist.

Ben Stiller
von Glimmer am 20.02.2014

Do you remember the movie "Keeping the Faith" with Ben Stiller? He goes to one of his dreaded Blind Dates and while his psycho Date gets ready he wanders around the living room, seeing this book he calls out "Tuesdays with Morrie an awesome book", well that got me hooked! I had to read it! One day I practically fell over it, so ... Do you remember the movie "Keeping the Faith" with Ben Stiller? He goes to one of his dreaded Blind Dates and while his psycho Date gets ready he wanders around the living room, seeing this book he calls out "Tuesdays with Morrie an awesome book", well that got me hooked! I had to read it! One day I practically fell over it, so I started reading! That´s actually all I can tell about this book! Everyone told me it is about a guy who learns what matters in life- not my favourite topic anyway and well all that happens is the young guy comes visits his teacher and goes. They talk but it is neither enlightening nor very good written. But who knows give it go, might be enlightening for you anyway!

Wonderful!
von Stefanie Kallart aus Augsburg am 03.05.2013

„Tuesdays with Morrie“ is one of my favorite books! The story of the old professor Morrie and his student Mitch is so wonderful and amazing. At first they don’t even have contact to each other but when Mitch sees his professor on television he contacts him. After that they meet every Tuesday and talk about important things like ... „Tuesdays with Morrie“ is one of my favorite books! The story of the old professor Morrie and his student Mitch is so wonderful and amazing. At first they don’t even have contact to each other but when Mitch sees his professor on television he contacts him. After that they meet every Tuesday and talk about important things like family, death, hope and a lot more. With every week Morries illness makes him weaker but he wants to help other people and give them hope. The story touches your heart not only because it is true! Mitch and Morrie are so close to each other and share their feelings and thoughts. “Tuesdays with Morrie” makes you think about your own life and shows you what is really important!